Session Title

Old English Religious Texts after the Norman Conquest

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Organizer Name

Dylan M. Wilkerson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Roy M. Liuzza

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 1

The Afterlife of the Old English Homily: A Poema Morale for a New Audience

Presenter 1 Name

Leslie Carpenter

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 2

Twelfth-Century Glosses and Revisions in a Manuscript of Ælfric's Homilies

Presenter 2 Name

Stephen Pelle

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Contemplating Connections: Old English in Twelfth-Century English Verse

Presenter 3 Name

Carla María Thomas

Presenter 3 Affiliation

New York Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2017 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

This session will feature papers discussing Old English religious texts including hagiography, sermons, homilies, and more, with special attention paid to the ways that these texts were read and copied in the years after the Norman Conquest. Scholars previously believed that English "disappeared" in the eleventh century and only re-emerged as a language of literature much later. This session will explore the ways that English endured in the changed religious and cultural landscape of the twelfth century and beyond.

Most of the Old English sessions at ICMS focus on poetry, and with good reason; the study of poetry constitutes the bulk of scholarship in the field. This session creates a space which engages an important and emerging sub-field of Anglo-Saxon studies: the connection between Old and Middle English literature. In an edited collection of articles published in 2006, Elaine M. Treharne, Mary Swan, Roy Liuzza, Jonathan Wilcox, and others, explored the continued use of Old English into the twelfth century, most often in manuscripts treating religious themes, such as collections of homilies, saints' lives, psalters, or biblical translations. Other research continues to open up new avenues of inquiry, including the study of the influence of Old English on the so-called "Ancrene-Wisse/Catherine Group" of Middle English texts written in the thirteenth century.

Dylan M. Wilkerson

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May 14th, 8:30 AM

Old English Religious Texts after the Norman Conquest

Fetzer 1005

This session will feature papers discussing Old English religious texts including hagiography, sermons, homilies, and more, with special attention paid to the ways that these texts were read and copied in the years after the Norman Conquest. Scholars previously believed that English "disappeared" in the eleventh century and only re-emerged as a language of literature much later. This session will explore the ways that English endured in the changed religious and cultural landscape of the twelfth century and beyond.

Most of the Old English sessions at ICMS focus on poetry, and with good reason; the study of poetry constitutes the bulk of scholarship in the field. This session creates a space which engages an important and emerging sub-field of Anglo-Saxon studies: the connection between Old and Middle English literature. In an edited collection of articles published in 2006, Elaine M. Treharne, Mary Swan, Roy Liuzza, Jonathan Wilcox, and others, explored the continued use of Old English into the twelfth century, most often in manuscripts treating religious themes, such as collections of homilies, saints' lives, psalters, or biblical translations. Other research continues to open up new avenues of inquiry, including the study of the influence of Old English on the so-called "Ancrene-Wisse/Catherine Group" of Middle English texts written in the thirteenth century.

Dylan M. Wilkerson