Session Title

Transformations in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages I: Restructuring the World

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of History, Durham Univ.

Organizer Name

Helen Foxhall Forbes

Organizer Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Presider Name

Sarah J. Semple

Presider Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Restructuring Early Christianity: Chains of Succession and Epistolary Networks in Eusebius of Caesarea

Presenter 1 Name

James Corke-Webster

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 2

Riding the Currents of Power: The Patriarchate of Jerusalem from Antiquity to the Crusades

Presenter 2 Name

Daniel Reynolds

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Start Date

14-5-2017 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

This session aims to open up debates about the ways in which people in late antiquity and the early middle ages restructured the world around them, or perceived its restructuring to be taking place, at both macro-and micro-levels. James Corke-Webster examines how Eusebius refigured the structure of the Church and its relationship to Roman models of authority. Brian Buchanan uses burial evidence to explore the emerging post-Roman identities and political structures in the landscape of the early Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria. Daniel Reynolds investigates the Jerusalem Patiarchate, focusing on how its links with Byzantium and the early medieval West can inform us about the transition from late antiquity to the early middle ages.

Helen G. Foxhall Forbes

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May 14th, 8:30 AM

Transformations in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages I: Restructuring the World

Fetzer 2020

This session aims to open up debates about the ways in which people in late antiquity and the early middle ages restructured the world around them, or perceived its restructuring to be taking place, at both macro-and micro-levels. James Corke-Webster examines how Eusebius refigured the structure of the Church and its relationship to Roman models of authority. Brian Buchanan uses burial evidence to explore the emerging post-Roman identities and political structures in the landscape of the early Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria. Daniel Reynolds investigates the Jerusalem Patiarchate, focusing on how its links with Byzantium and the early medieval West can inform us about the transition from late antiquity to the early middle ages.

Helen G. Foxhall Forbes