Session Title

Through a Medieval Looking Glass: Reading Eustache Deschamps's Miroir de mariage

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi

Organizer Affiliation

Stevens Institute of Technology

Presider Name

Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi

Paper Title 1

The Miroir de mariage and the Vernacular Debate between the Vita Contemplativa and Vita Activa

Presenter 1 Name

Margriet Hoogvliet

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Rijksuniv. Groningen

Paper Title 2

Reconstructing Female Voices to Speak about Women: A Comparison Between Eustache Deschamps's Miroir de mariage and Geoffroy de la Tour Landry’s Livre pour l'enseignement de ses filles

Presenter 2 Name

Delphine Mercuzot

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Bibliothèque nationale de France

Start Date

14-5-2017 8:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1355

Description

Eustache Deschamps' Miroir de mariage has vexed scholars for many years -- in part because editions are few and translations, non-existent. Although the poet has drawn increasing interest from the scholarly community as Deschamps students have expanded in the last 30 years, the Miroir remains relatively unexplored. Is it a serious debate poem? Is it an encyclopedic compendium? What explains the poet's widely divergent content?: densely mystical metaphorical visions of the rewards of Christian behavior; searing portraits of the manners of the bourgeois; reworkings of stock pieces from the Widow of Ephesus to Secundus the Silent; catalogs of fish and fowl; accurate [?] depictions of the odd behaviors of men and women of many classes. This session solicits essays to examine ways to read all or sections of the Miroir.

Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi

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May 14th, 8:30 AM

Through a Medieval Looking Glass: Reading Eustache Deschamps's Miroir de mariage

Schneider 1355

Eustache Deschamps' Miroir de mariage has vexed scholars for many years -- in part because editions are few and translations, non-existent. Although the poet has drawn increasing interest from the scholarly community as Deschamps students have expanded in the last 30 years, the Miroir remains relatively unexplored. Is it a serious debate poem? Is it an encyclopedic compendium? What explains the poet's widely divergent content?: densely mystical metaphorical visions of the rewards of Christian behavior; searing portraits of the manners of the bourgeois; reworkings of stock pieces from the Widow of Ephesus to Secundus the Silent; catalogs of fish and fowl; accurate [?] depictions of the odd behaviors of men and women of many classes. This session solicits essays to examine ways to read all or sections of the Miroir.

Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi