Session Title

Arthurian Books and Readers

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Arthurian Literature

Organizer Name

David F. Johnson

Organizer Affiliation

Florida State Univ.

Presider Name

Elizabeth Archibald

Presider Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Reading Walter Map into the Lancelot-Grail Cycle

Presenter 1 Name

Joshua Byron Smith

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fayetteville

Paper Title 2

Cultivating Courtesy (Redux): Reading Sir Gawain and the Carle of Carlisle in NLW MS Brogyntyn II.1

Presenter 2 Name

Kelsey Moskal

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Paper Title 3

Reading with Fingers in the Manuscript of Sir Thomas Malory's "Hoole Book of Kyng Arthur"

Presenter 3 Name

Kevin S. Whetter

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Acadia Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1040

Description

Arthurian manuscripts circulated widely across medieval Europe, and are often found today far from their original homes. This circulation, and the comments of readers (in both annotations and personal correspondence) offer invaluable evidence about reading habits and the reception of the evergreen Arthurian legend. For instance, in 1378 Luchino Visconti, wanting amusement on a long sea voyage, wrote to a friend asking for the loan of ‘a romance that speaks of Tristan or Lancelot or some other lovely and delectable material’. In England, someone added the motto of the Order of the Garter, ‘honi soit qui mal y pense’, at the end of the only surviving manuscript of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: there is much debate about whether this addition is scribal, and how it affects interpretation of the text. This session invites papers on what Arthurian manuscripts can tell us about their readers, both medieval and post-medieval, and about individual responses to Arthurian characters and tales in different countries and centuries.

David F. Johnson

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 11th, 1:30 PM

Arthurian Books and Readers

Fetzer 1040

Arthurian manuscripts circulated widely across medieval Europe, and are often found today far from their original homes. This circulation, and the comments of readers (in both annotations and personal correspondence) offer invaluable evidence about reading habits and the reception of the evergreen Arthurian legend. For instance, in 1378 Luchino Visconti, wanting amusement on a long sea voyage, wrote to a friend asking for the loan of ‘a romance that speaks of Tristan or Lancelot or some other lovely and delectable material’. In England, someone added the motto of the Order of the Garter, ‘honi soit qui mal y pense’, at the end of the only surviving manuscript of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: there is much debate about whether this addition is scribal, and how it affects interpretation of the text. This session invites papers on what Arthurian manuscripts can tell us about their readers, both medieval and post-medieval, and about individual responses to Arthurian characters and tales in different countries and centuries.

David F. Johnson