Session Title

Gender and Species: Ecofeminist Intersections (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Carolynn Van Dyke

Organizer Affiliation

Lafayette College

Presider Name

Lesley Kordecki

Presider Affiliation

DePaul Univ.

Paper Title 1

Does It Have to Be about Women? Feminism Goes to the Dogs

Presenter 1 Name

Carolynn Van Dyke

Paper Title 2

Compassion and Benignytee: A Reassessment of the Relationship between Canacee and the Falcon in Chaucer's Squire's Tale

Presenter 2 Name

Melissa Ridley Elmes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Lindenwood Univ.

Paper Title 3

La Femme Bisclavret: Gender, Species, and Language

Presenter 3 Name

Alison Langdon

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Western Kentucky Univ.

Paper Title 4

The Owl and the Nightingale: Belligerent Mothers and the Power of Feminine Speech

Presenter 4 Name

Wendy A. Matlock

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Kansas State Univ.

Paper Title 5

Flying, Hunting, Reading: Feminism and Falconry

Presenter 5 Name

Sara Petrosillo

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Davis

Paper Title 6

Questioning Gynocentric Utopia: Nature as Addict in "Farewell to Cookeham"

Presenter 6 Name

Liberty S. Stanavage

Presenter 6 Affiliation

SUNY-Potsdam

Start Date

11-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

At a 2016 Kalamazoo roundtable, “New Feminist Approaches to Chaucer,” several participants pointed out that few recent presentations and publications in medieval studies are explicitly “feminist.” Of course, as others observed, feminist work may be proceeding under various other labels, including ecocriticism and the new materialism. The approaches converge in some strong recent publications, but we believe that there is room for additional attention to the convergences themselves. In this roundtable participants explore the intersection of critical animal studies and feminism in medieval texts and medieval studies. For instance, how does the gendering of nonhuman creatures in bestiaries, fables, and romance reflect or challenge patriarchal norms? How do those gendered representations reflect the actual behavior of dimorphic animals? How are human-animal interactions in medieval texts gendered? We hope to stimulate discussion also of a broader question: does the growing interest in nonhuman agency advance, complicate, or inhibit our understanding of feminist concerns?

Carolynn Van Dyke

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Gender and Species: Ecofeminist Intersections (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1280

At a 2016 Kalamazoo roundtable, “New Feminist Approaches to Chaucer,” several participants pointed out that few recent presentations and publications in medieval studies are explicitly “feminist.” Of course, as others observed, feminist work may be proceeding under various other labels, including ecocriticism and the new materialism. The approaches converge in some strong recent publications, but we believe that there is room for additional attention to the convergences themselves. In this roundtable participants explore the intersection of critical animal studies and feminism in medieval texts and medieval studies. For instance, how does the gendering of nonhuman creatures in bestiaries, fables, and romance reflect or challenge patriarchal norms? How do those gendered representations reflect the actual behavior of dimorphic animals? How are human-animal interactions in medieval texts gendered? We hope to stimulate discussion also of a broader question: does the growing interest in nonhuman agency advance, complicate, or inhibit our understanding of feminist concerns?

Carolynn Van Dyke