Session Title

Inscriptions

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Early Book Society

Organizer Name

Martha W. Driver

Organizer Affiliation

Pace Univ.

Presider Name

Michael W. Twomey

Presider Affiliation

Ithaca College

Paper Title 1

Spaces, Signs, and Original Charters in the Cartulary of the Cathedral Church of Angoulême

Presenter 1 Name

Michael F. Webb

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 2

Other People's Names: Multivalent Marginalia in Agnès de Bourgogne's Books

Presenter 2 Name

S. C. Kaplan

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Paper Title 3

British Library Sloane MS 3011 and an Inscription to a False Queen

Presenter 3 Name

Valerie Schutte

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

11-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1750

Description

To inscribe means simply to write, mark, or delineate (using words or signs). The study of inscriptions offers vivid and immediate evidence of late medieval culture as well as insight into language and literacy. Inscriptions may be found as markings, annotations, or in the form of a dedication of a book or work of art to patron or reader. This session will explore a range of inscriptions, from peculiar crosses appearing in a 12c cartulary to fifteenth-century annotations in a copy of Tristan en prose that seem to indicate a network of women readers to an analysis of one book dedication to Lady Jane Grey, placing that dedication in the context of other dedications given to Mary and Elizabeth Tudor.

Martha W. Driver

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Inscriptions

Sangren 1750

To inscribe means simply to write, mark, or delineate (using words or signs). The study of inscriptions offers vivid and immediate evidence of late medieval culture as well as insight into language and literacy. Inscriptions may be found as markings, annotations, or in the form of a dedication of a book or work of art to patron or reader. This session will explore a range of inscriptions, from peculiar crosses appearing in a 12c cartulary to fifteenth-century annotations in a copy of Tristan en prose that seem to indicate a network of women readers to an analysis of one book dedication to Lady Jane Grey, placing that dedication in the context of other dedications given to Mary and Elizabeth Tudor.

Martha W. Driver