Session Title

C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages II: Lewis and Eros (In Memory of Joy Davidman)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for the Study of C. S. Lewis and Friends, Taylor Univ.

Organizer Name

Joe Ricke

Organizer Affiliation

Taylor Univ.

Presider Name

Robert Moore-Jumonville

Presider Affiliation

Spring Arbor Univ.

Paper Title 1

Divine Eros: Julian's Revelations of Divine Love and The Great Divorce

Presenter 1 Name

Corey Latta

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Christ United Methodist Church

Paper Title 2

Eros in Lewis's Till We Have Faces

Presenter 2 Name

Laura Smit

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Calvin College

Start Date

11-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley II LeFevre 201

Description

This session features paper which look closely at C. S. Lewis's attitudes towards and use of the concept of "Eros" in his writings--scholarly, popular theology, and creative. Whether the erotic side of mystical theology (as in Dame Julian), the somewhat subtle erotic dimension of The Chronicles of Narnia or the more famous characterization of Eros himself in Till We Have Faces, Lewis was fascinated, troubled, and inspired by this powerful reality of human life. The session is dedicated to the memory of Joy Davidman (d. 1957), whose love Lewis celebrated especially in A Grief Observed and is evident everywhere in his later works.

Joe M. Ricke

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages II: Lewis and Eros (In Memory of Joy Davidman)

Valley II LeFevre 201

This session features paper which look closely at C. S. Lewis's attitudes towards and use of the concept of "Eros" in his writings--scholarly, popular theology, and creative. Whether the erotic side of mystical theology (as in Dame Julian), the somewhat subtle erotic dimension of The Chronicles of Narnia or the more famous characterization of Eros himself in Till We Have Faces, Lewis was fascinated, troubled, and inspired by this powerful reality of human life. The session is dedicated to the memory of Joy Davidman (d. 1957), whose love Lewis celebrated especially in A Grief Observed and is evident everywhere in his later works.

Joe M. Ricke