Title of Presentation Proposal

Bystander Intervention: An evidence-based program for sexual assault prevention on college campuses

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

According to the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, (RAINN; 2018), one American is sexually assaulted every 98 seconds. Sexual violence on college campuses is even more pervasive: Among undergraduates, 23.1% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation (Association of American Universities, 2015). These statistics are disturbingly high and have been given more attention recently in light of the many sexual assault allegations in the media and the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements this year. As counseling psychologists and psychologists in training, we have to ask ourselves, “what are we doing?”

Our poster will highlight bystander intervention (BI) as an innovative way in which counseling psychologists are engaging in difficult conversations and providing skills training to bystanders on college campuses. Research has supported that bystanders are effective in reducing victimizations as they have prevented injuries in an average of 1.2 million violent victimizations per year between 1993 and 1999 (Planty, 2002). The goals of BI programming broadly include: prevention of sexual misconduct, assault, and violence, and promotion of positive social norms like mutual respect and tolerance (National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), 2013). Community-based sexual violence prevention programs like BI can play an instrumental role in educating people about behaviors that contribute to rape culture and ending sexual violence (Banyard, Plante, & Moynihan, 2005; Coker et. al., 2011; Moynihan & Banyard, 2008; Moynihan, Banyard, Arnold, Eckstein, & Stapleton, 2011). Bystander intervention programs are quickly becoming the “gold standard” of community-based prevention for sexual assault. Fortunately, for those organizations attempting to build a BI program, The National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created evidence-based strategies for bystander intervention programs.

The Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980) indicates that perceived behavioral control (beliefs about one's ability to perform a behavior) and behavioral intentions are predictive of an individual’s behavior. Based on this theory, bystander Intervention programs are effective when they influence participants beliefs about intervening in situations of possible sexual assault and increase their intention to perform an intervention (Montaño & Kasprzyk, 2002). The NSVRC describes that evidence-based strategies for BI on college campuses include teaching participants to name and stop situations that could lead to sexual violence, to speak out against ideas and behaviors that support sexual violence, and to build skills to be supportive allies to survivors after an assault has taken place (NSVRC, 2014; Banyard, Moynihan, & Plante, 2007; Cissner, 2009).

his poster will present 1) a review of sexual assault on college campuses, 2) an outline of the strategies recommended by the NSVRC, 3) the process that Ball State University’s (BSU) Sexual Threats Oppression and Prevention (STOP) Team used to created a BI program considering principles from the Theory of Planned Behavior, and 4) how BSU’s STOP team implemented such a program for specific groups (e.g., Greek Life), the campus, and community. Implications of BI programs within a college campus incorporating a social justice lens will be discussed.

Start Date

4-14-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

4-14-2018 9:20 AM

Location

2nd Floor

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Apr 14th, 8:30 AM Apr 14th, 9:20 AM

Bystander Intervention: An evidence-based program for sexual assault prevention on college campuses

2nd Floor

According to the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, (RAINN; 2018), one American is sexually assaulted every 98 seconds. Sexual violence on college campuses is even more pervasive: Among undergraduates, 23.1% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation (Association of American Universities, 2015). These statistics are disturbingly high and have been given more attention recently in light of the many sexual assault allegations in the media and the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements this year. As counseling psychologists and psychologists in training, we have to ask ourselves, “what are we doing?”

Our poster will highlight bystander intervention (BI) as an innovative way in which counseling psychologists are engaging in difficult conversations and providing skills training to bystanders on college campuses. Research has supported that bystanders are effective in reducing victimizations as they have prevented injuries in an average of 1.2 million violent victimizations per year between 1993 and 1999 (Planty, 2002). The goals of BI programming broadly include: prevention of sexual misconduct, assault, and violence, and promotion of positive social norms like mutual respect and tolerance (National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), 2013). Community-based sexual violence prevention programs like BI can play an instrumental role in educating people about behaviors that contribute to rape culture and ending sexual violence (Banyard, Plante, & Moynihan, 2005; Coker et. al., 2011; Moynihan & Banyard, 2008; Moynihan, Banyard, Arnold, Eckstein, & Stapleton, 2011). Bystander intervention programs are quickly becoming the “gold standard” of community-based prevention for sexual assault. Fortunately, for those organizations attempting to build a BI program, The National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created evidence-based strategies for bystander intervention programs.

The Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980) indicates that perceived behavioral control (beliefs about one's ability to perform a behavior) and behavioral intentions are predictive of an individual’s behavior. Based on this theory, bystander Intervention programs are effective when they influence participants beliefs about intervening in situations of possible sexual assault and increase their intention to perform an intervention (Montaño & Kasprzyk, 2002). The NSVRC describes that evidence-based strategies for BI on college campuses include teaching participants to name and stop situations that could lead to sexual violence, to speak out against ideas and behaviors that support sexual violence, and to build skills to be supportive allies to survivors after an assault has taken place (NSVRC, 2014; Banyard, Moynihan, & Plante, 2007; Cissner, 2009).

his poster will present 1) a review of sexual assault on college campuses, 2) an outline of the strategies recommended by the NSVRC, 3) the process that Ball State University’s (BSU) Sexual Threats Oppression and Prevention (STOP) Team used to created a BI program considering principles from the Theory of Planned Behavior, and 4) how BSU’s STOP team implemented such a program for specific groups (e.g., Greek Life), the campus, and community. Implications of BI programs within a college campus incorporating a social justice lens will be discussed.