Title of Presentation Proposal

The Effects of Resilience on Psychological, Relational, and Academic Well-being among International Students in the United States

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The current study investigated the relationship between stressors (e.g. acculturative stress, current political and policy stress) that are often experienced by international students and psychological, relational and academic wellbeing including depression and anxiety symptoms, connectedness to U.S. society and sense of belonging to campus community, academic control and self-efficacy. In addition, the current study also used a resilience framework to directly examine international students’ resilience and its impact on the relation between stressors and wellbeing. 111 international students currently studying in the U.S participated in the online survey. Results showed that acculturative stress negatively predicted sense of belonging to campus community and feelings of connectedness to the U.S. mainstream society. Resilience factors measured by both Connor-Davidson Resilience scale (CD-RISC) and Resilience Scale of Adults (RSA) predicted depression and anxiety symptoms, academic control and academic self-efficacy. Only Connor-Davidson Resilience scale (CD-RISC) predicted students sense of belonging to campus community. There was not an interaction effect between stressors and resilience. Discussion and implications of the findings were provided.

Start Date

4-14-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2018 3:50 PM

Location

2nd Floor

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Apr 14th, 3:00 PM Apr 14th, 3:50 PM

The Effects of Resilience on Psychological, Relational, and Academic Well-being among International Students in the United States

2nd Floor

The current study investigated the relationship between stressors (e.g. acculturative stress, current political and policy stress) that are often experienced by international students and psychological, relational and academic wellbeing including depression and anxiety symptoms, connectedness to U.S. society and sense of belonging to campus community, academic control and self-efficacy. In addition, the current study also used a resilience framework to directly examine international students’ resilience and its impact on the relation between stressors and wellbeing. 111 international students currently studying in the U.S participated in the online survey. Results showed that acculturative stress negatively predicted sense of belonging to campus community and feelings of connectedness to the U.S. mainstream society. Resilience factors measured by both Connor-Davidson Resilience scale (CD-RISC) and Resilience Scale of Adults (RSA) predicted depression and anxiety symptoms, academic control and academic self-efficacy. Only Connor-Davidson Resilience scale (CD-RISC) predicted students sense of belonging to campus community. There was not an interaction effect between stressors and resilience. Discussion and implications of the findings were provided.