Author

Al-Hajri

Date of Award

12-1990

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Sociology

First Advisor

Dr. James Petersen

Second Advisor

Dr. Jawid Abdul Ghani

Third Advisor

Dr. Thomas VanValey

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

This study was designed to explore job satisfaction facets, similarities, differences, and associations among 324 public and private sector employees in Saudi Arabia. Results indicated that subjects from the private sector were satisfied with eight job satisfaction factors (responsibility, recognition and relationship with peers and subordinates, working conditions, opportunity for advancement, personal development and opportunity to make own decision, time demands and requirements of the job, organizational policies and personal recognition, social status, and security and salary) and dissatisfied with one factor (supervisory techniques), while subjects from the public sector were satisfied with four job satisfaction factors (responsibility, recognition and relationships with peers and subordinates, supervisory techniques, working conditions, and security and salary) and dissatisfied with five factors (personal development and opportunity to make own decision, time demands and requirements of the job, organizational policies and personal recognition, social status and opportunity for advancement).

All subjects agreed on one factor as the most important for them: responsibility, recognition and relationships with peers and subordinates. Recommendations are made for improving job satisfaction in both sectors. Opportunities for further research are identified.

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