Author

Bennett

Date of Award

12-1984

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Communication

First Advisor

Dr. Steve Rhodes

Second Advisor

Dr. Ernie Stech

Third Advisor

Dr. Shirley Van Hoeven

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

This study hypothesized that high writing apprehensive subjects would differ significantly from low writing apprehensive subjects in regard to the writing intensity of their jobs. A random sample of 143 people employed in clerical, technical, secretarial, professional, supervisory, or administrative positions in one midwestern company was studied. Subjects completed the Writing Apprehension Test and the Writing Intensity Questionnaire. The latter was designed for this study to measure the amount and type of writing projects subjects produced, plus audience and deadline pressure. A significant difference (p = .004) was seen in the mean writing intensity scores between high apprehensives (n = 54) and low apprehensives (n = 43).

Included in

Communication Commons

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