Session Title

Past, Present, Future: Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture

Organizer Name

Michael A. Torregrossa

Organizer Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Presider Name

Whitney Dirks-Schuster

Presider Affiliation

Grand Valley State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Haunting Poltergeists: Historical and Cinematic Representations of Ghosts as Demonic Monsters

Presenter 1 Name

Rex Barnes

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Queer and the Dead: Medieval Revenants and Their Afterlives in In the Flesh

Presenter 2 Name

Elliot Mason

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Concordia Univ. Montréal

Paper Title 3

The Witcher’s Anal Eye: Monstrous Technologies of the Medievalized Other in Witcher 3: Wild Hunt

Presenter 3 Name

Kevin Moberly; Brent Addison Moberly

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Old Dominion Univ.; Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 4

The Monstrous Mongols in Medieval Eurasia and Modern Day Film

Presenter 4 Name

Colleen C. Ho

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Maryland

Start Date

12-5-2018 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1160

Description

The year 2018 marks the two-hundredth anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and, while this is certainly an important event, to celebrate it outside of its larger context is to ignore the rich history of the monstrous in Western tradition that underlies much of Shelley’s representation of the creature brought to life by Victor Frankenstein. Medieval texts, in particular, abound with monsters, and, like the creation of young Frankenstein, many of these remain prevalent in the minds (and, perhaps, fears) of modern-day audiences. Still, while Monster Studies has grown phenomenally as a discipline in recent decades, few have explored how medieval monsters, like their more modern counterparts, exist as part of an ongoing tradition from their point of origin in the medieval past to their most recent depiction in popular culture.

In furtherance of the goals of The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture, we seek in this panel to unite Medieval Studies, Medievalism Studies, Monster Studies, and Popular Culture Studies to highlight points of contact between medieval monsters and their post-medieval representations. We hope to explore both continuity and change in addressing how these figures have been portrayed and to extrapolate from these trends to suggest how these monsters may be employed in future texts.

Michael A. Torregrossa

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Past, Present, Future: Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives II

Schneider 1160

The year 2018 marks the two-hundredth anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and, while this is certainly an important event, to celebrate it outside of its larger context is to ignore the rich history of the monstrous in Western tradition that underlies much of Shelley’s representation of the creature brought to life by Victor Frankenstein. Medieval texts, in particular, abound with monsters, and, like the creation of young Frankenstein, many of these remain prevalent in the minds (and, perhaps, fears) of modern-day audiences. Still, while Monster Studies has grown phenomenally as a discipline in recent decades, few have explored how medieval monsters, like their more modern counterparts, exist as part of an ongoing tradition from their point of origin in the medieval past to their most recent depiction in popular culture.

In furtherance of the goals of The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture, we seek in this panel to unite Medieval Studies, Medievalism Studies, Monster Studies, and Popular Culture Studies to highlight points of contact between medieval monsters and their post-medieval representations. We hope to explore both continuity and change in addressing how these figures have been portrayed and to extrapolate from these trends to suggest how these monsters may be employed in future texts.

Michael A. Torregrossa