Session Title

Central Europe across and without Borders (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Austrian Studies, Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Hill Museum&Manuscript Library (HMML)

Organizer Name

Jan Volek

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Presider Name

Matthew Z. Heintzelman

Presider Affiliation

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Christian Raffensperger

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Wittenberg Univ.

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

András Vadas

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Eötvös Loránd Univ.

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Howard Louthan

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Start Date

10-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1120

Description

The history and study of Central Europe has been marked by the presence of multiple borders. In addition to the shifting political boundaries, this region has also been rift by national, linguistic, and religious divisions. These fissures have also been reflected in the historical accounts of this region, which is still in a need of a broader integrating narrative. This panel provides the opportunity for scholars to consider the position of this region in scholarship and to examine its current challenges, methodological approaches, as well as opportunities for future research. We hope that this occasion can not only help to stimulate further discussion on the place of Central Europe in medieval scholarship but also attract new generation of scholars to investigate the past of this exciting and important region.

Jan Volek

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Central Europe across and without Borders (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1120

The history and study of Central Europe has been marked by the presence of multiple borders. In addition to the shifting political boundaries, this region has also been rift by national, linguistic, and religious divisions. These fissures have also been reflected in the historical accounts of this region, which is still in a need of a broader integrating narrative. This panel provides the opportunity for scholars to consider the position of this region in scholarship and to examine its current challenges, methodological approaches, as well as opportunities for future research. We hope that this occasion can not only help to stimulate further discussion on the place of Central Europe in medieval scholarship but also attract new generation of scholars to investigate the past of this exciting and important region.

Jan Volek