Session Title

Jahānsāzi: Text, Space, and Place in Medieval Islamicate Literary Worlds

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Great Lakes Adiban Society

Organizer Name

Cameron Cross

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Presider Name

Nathan L. M. Tabor

Presider Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 1

The "Char-takht" of Husayn Abivardi

Presenter 1 Name

Theodore Beers

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 2

Learning to Be Sufi, Writing to Make History: Malfuzat in the Chishti Context

Presenter 2 Name

Manpreet Kaur

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 3

Distant and Imagined Lands of Fiction

Presenter 3 Name

N. Ipek Huner-Cora

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 4

Dangerous Authenticity: What It Means to Be from the Iranian "Otherworld"

Presenter 4 Name

Samuel Lasman

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Start Date

11-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1345

Description

This panel will consider the relation of physical environments, real or imagined, to literary production and historiography. As Islam spread to encompass a vast variety of climates and landscapes, both the cultures that it brought in its wake and the indigenous cultures it encountered worked to negotiate the relationships between humans and their environment through literary productions. In later centuries, shifting borders brought narratives of loss, nostalgia, and destruction into play. In literary terms, what did it mean to gain, lose, create or destroy places? How did the lived or perceived conditions of cities, provinces, and wildernesses — both distant and familiar — affect the depiction of those places in literature, or the invention of new places in speculative or fantastical works? How did the spaces through which writers traveled or migrated shape their creations? What role did wider environmental shifts, such as urbanization and climate change, play in the development of literary traditions? By considering perspectives from fields as broad as literary studies, cultural history, geography, and historical ecology, this panel aims to create an interdisciplinary conversation on the building of medieval Islamicate literary worlds.

Cameron Cross

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Jahānsāzi: Text, Space, and Place in Medieval Islamicate Literary Worlds

Schneider 1345

This panel will consider the relation of physical environments, real or imagined, to literary production and historiography. As Islam spread to encompass a vast variety of climates and landscapes, both the cultures that it brought in its wake and the indigenous cultures it encountered worked to negotiate the relationships between humans and their environment through literary productions. In later centuries, shifting borders brought narratives of loss, nostalgia, and destruction into play. In literary terms, what did it mean to gain, lose, create or destroy places? How did the lived or perceived conditions of cities, provinces, and wildernesses — both distant and familiar — affect the depiction of those places in literature, or the invention of new places in speculative or fantastical works? How did the spaces through which writers traveled or migrated shape their creations? What role did wider environmental shifts, such as urbanization and climate change, play in the development of literary traditions? By considering perspectives from fields as broad as literary studies, cultural history, geography, and historical ecology, this panel aims to create an interdisciplinary conversation on the building of medieval Islamicate literary worlds.

Cameron Cross