Session Title

The Twenty-First-Century Medievalist: Digital Methods, Career Diversity, and Beyond (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

CARA (Committee on Centers and Regional Associations, Medieval Academy of America)

Organizer Name

Sarah Davis-Secord

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of New Mexico

Presider Name

Sarah Davis-Secord

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Abigail G. Robertson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of New Mexico

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Dorothy Carr Porter

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Racha Kirakosian

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Johanna Kramer

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Start Date

10-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

Description

What does it mean to be, or to train our students to be, medievalists in the 21st century? With the competing demands of learning new digital methods, training for a job market that reaches far beyond the academy, and worrying about widespread attacks on the humanities, it can sometimes feel like a difficult time to be or to train students to become scholars of the premodern world. And yet, other perspectives might suggest that this is the best time of all to be a medievalist – with new technologies opening up new questions and approaches to sources, a focus on global history that broadens our medieval horizons, new media outlets that increase audiences for our work, and the growing openness about the various career paths medievalists can follow, this panel will discuss ways to productively approach these new norms with optimism. This panel will feature four or five speakers discussing how we can work, teach, and train students within this new world while studying and teaching a very old world.

Sarah Davis-Secord

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

The Twenty-First-Century Medievalist: Digital Methods, Career Diversity, and Beyond (A Roundtable)

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

What does it mean to be, or to train our students to be, medievalists in the 21st century? With the competing demands of learning new digital methods, training for a job market that reaches far beyond the academy, and worrying about widespread attacks on the humanities, it can sometimes feel like a difficult time to be or to train students to become scholars of the premodern world. And yet, other perspectives might suggest that this is the best time of all to be a medievalist – with new technologies opening up new questions and approaches to sources, a focus on global history that broadens our medieval horizons, new media outlets that increase audiences for our work, and the growing openness about the various career paths medievalists can follow, this panel will discuss ways to productively approach these new norms with optimism. This panel will feature four or five speakers discussing how we can work, teach, and train students within this new world while studying and teaching a very old world.

Sarah Davis-Secord