Session Title

Law and Legal Culture in the Fourteenth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

Elizabeth Papp Kamali

Organizer Affiliation

Harvard Law School

Presider Name

Aleksandra Pfau

Presider Affiliation

Hendrix College

Paper Title 1

The Men in the Middle: Royal Officials and Local Communities in Fourteenth-Century England

Presenter 1 Name

Eliza Buhrer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Loyola Univ. New Orleans

Paper Title 2

Legislative Kingship in Castile from Alfonso X to Alfonso XXI

Presenter 2 Name

David Cantor-Echols

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 3

The Re-emergence of Customary Law in Fourteenth-Century Aragon

Presenter 3 Name

Jennifer Speed

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Dayton

Start Date

13-5-2018 8:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

Punctuated by crisis, ranging from famine to plague to revolt, the fourteenth century was a time of tremendous legal innovation and yet, in some areas, also a century of gradual evolution and even stasis in the law. In some localities, customary law came into conflict with an increasingly well-defined common law (e.g., in England) or ius commune (in continental Europe). The fourteenth century also witnessed the production of written compilations of law; some would argue that the very act of recording custom or law transformed it into something new. This panel will explore the nature and impact of law and legal culture in the fourteenth century, welcoming papers on such topics as: legal innovation in response to crisis, the rise of the legal profession, jurisdictional competition between center and periphery, and the role of customary law in a world of increasingly written law. Papers are welcome on any aspect of this broad theme, and geographical diversity will be a priority in selecting papers for the panel.

Debra A. Salata

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May 13th, 8:30 AM

Law and Legal Culture in the Fourteenth Century

Bernhard 211

Punctuated by crisis, ranging from famine to plague to revolt, the fourteenth century was a time of tremendous legal innovation and yet, in some areas, also a century of gradual evolution and even stasis in the law. In some localities, customary law came into conflict with an increasingly well-defined common law (e.g., in England) or ius commune (in continental Europe). The fourteenth century also witnessed the production of written compilations of law; some would argue that the very act of recording custom or law transformed it into something new. This panel will explore the nature and impact of law and legal culture in the fourteenth century, welcoming papers on such topics as: legal innovation in response to crisis, the rise of the legal profession, jurisdictional competition between center and periphery, and the role of customary law in a world of increasingly written law. Papers are welcome on any aspect of this broad theme, and geographical diversity will be a priority in selecting papers for the panel.

Debra A. Salata