Session Title

Changing Perspectives on the Guidonian Hand, or, What Is at Stake in Reconstructing the Musical Space of the Middle Ages? (A Panel Discussion)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Stefano Mengozzi

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Presider Name

Joseph Dyer

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Boston

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

James Borders

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Adam Bregman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

David Cohen

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Jan Herlinger

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Louisiana State Univ.

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Stefano Mengozzi

Start Date

13-5-2018 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

The Guidonian Hand is often portrayed as a veritable symbol of the musical space of historical Others. With its elaborate layout of (to us) counterintuitive combinations of A-G letters and ut-la syllables, the Hand reminds us that the often-unfamiliar sounds of medieval music are rooted on conceptual foundations that seem radically at odds with those governing the “tonal” music of the modern era. Yet, the Hand may be interpreted in radically different ways, which in turn depend on the assumptions that we bring to bear on the study of medieval music. This panel discussion will provide an opportunity to confront the merit of these competing interpretations, and the validity of the assumptions underlying them.

Stefano Mengozzi

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May 13th, 10:30 AM

Changing Perspectives on the Guidonian Hand, or, What Is at Stake in Reconstructing the Musical Space of the Middle Ages? (A Panel Discussion)

Bernhard 210

The Guidonian Hand is often portrayed as a veritable symbol of the musical space of historical Others. With its elaborate layout of (to us) counterintuitive combinations of A-G letters and ut-la syllables, the Hand reminds us that the often-unfamiliar sounds of medieval music are rooted on conceptual foundations that seem radically at odds with those governing the “tonal” music of the modern era. Yet, the Hand may be interpreted in radically different ways, which in turn depend on the assumptions that we bring to bear on the study of medieval music. This panel discussion will provide an opportunity to confront the merit of these competing interpretations, and the validity of the assumptions underlying them.

Stefano Mengozzi