Session Title

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium, Univ. of Virginia

Organizer Name

Justin Greenlee

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Presider Name

Justin Greenlee

Paper Title 1

The Culture of Polyphony at Notre-Dame of Paris

Presenter 1 Name

Eric Nemarich

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 2

Bishop Painting and Performing Liturgy: Visual Sources in Medieval Rituals of Church Dedication

Presenter 2 Name

Ángel Pazos-López

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Complutense de Madrid

Paper Title 3

Beatrice of Nazareth: Liturgical Participation through Ecstasy and Eucharist

Presenter 3 Name

Samantha Slaubaugh

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 4

Practicing Scriptures in Lay Communities: Comparative Textual Analysis on Liturgical Prayers on Stone Stelae in Medieval China

Presenter 4 Name

Junfu Wong

Presenter 4 Affiliation

School of Oriental and African Studies, Univ. of London

Start Date

10-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1340

Description

This panel proposal poses a simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? This panel invites scholars to consider the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions.

DeVan Ard

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

Schneider 1340

This panel proposal poses a simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? This panel invites scholars to consider the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions.

DeVan Ard