Session Title

Medievalists Read Moby Dick (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Studies, Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.-Fort Wayne

Organizer Name

Damian Fleming

Organizer Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.-Fort Wayne

Presider Name

Damian Fleming

Paper Title 1

Encyclopedism

Presenter 1 Name

Suzanne Conklin Akbari

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 2

Navigating Your Mid-Life Hypos: Journeys and Guides in Dante and Moby Dick

Presenter 2 Name

Jennifer Fast

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Dallas

Paper Title 3

The Sermon

Presenter 3 Name

Andrew Scheil

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 4

Picturing the Whale: Emoji Dick and the Limits of Adaptation

Presenter 4 Name

Kaylin O'Dell

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Paper Title 5

The Narrative Structure of Moby Dick as a Quest

Presenter 5 Name

Serena Howe

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Dallas

Paper Title 6

Providence and the Sea in the Moby Dick

Presenter 6 Name

Tiffany Schubert

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Univ. of Dallas

Start Date

10-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

Herman Melville’s Moby Dick has long been recognized and studied as one of the highlights of nineteenth-century American literature and among the most influential novels ever written. This novel is also deeply appealing to a wide range of medievalists, who are interested in its form, sources, narrative, and production history, just name a few aspects. Our roundtable gathers a range of medievalists to interrogate the appeal of this text to scholars with our particular training. What is it like for a medievalist to read Moby Dick against the background of medieval texts and material culture? How might we contribute to a broader understanding of this text using the tools of medieval studies? We envision a series of short presentations on a select number of these issues followed by a capacious discussion of this text as viewed through our particular scholarly lenses. In a world where the humanities are increasingly dealing with scarcer and scarcer resources, we hope to open a discussion with our colleagues in American Studies and demonstrate to the wider scholarly world the benefits of broad interdisciplinary collaboration.

Damian Fleming

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Medievalists Read Moby Dick (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1045

Herman Melville’s Moby Dick has long been recognized and studied as one of the highlights of nineteenth-century American literature and among the most influential novels ever written. This novel is also deeply appealing to a wide range of medievalists, who are interested in its form, sources, narrative, and production history, just name a few aspects. Our roundtable gathers a range of medievalists to interrogate the appeal of this text to scholars with our particular training. What is it like for a medievalist to read Moby Dick against the background of medieval texts and material culture? How might we contribute to a broader understanding of this text using the tools of medieval studies? We envision a series of short presentations on a select number of these issues followed by a capacious discussion of this text as viewed through our particular scholarly lenses. In a world where the humanities are increasingly dealing with scarcer and scarcer resources, we hope to open a discussion with our colleagues in American Studies and demonstrate to the wider scholarly world the benefits of broad interdisciplinary collaboration.

Damian Fleming