Session Title

In Her Own Words: Twelfth-Century French Women's Voices in Performance (A Performance Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Simonetta Cochis

Organizer Affiliation

Transylvania Univ.

Presider Name

Simonetta Cochis

Paper Title 1

Participant

Presenter 1 Name

Dorothy Gilbert

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Paper Title 2

Participant

Presenter 2 Name

Julie Human

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Kentucky

Paper Title 3

Participant

Presenter 3 Name

Yvonne LeBlanc

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 4

Participant

Presenter 4 Name

Tamara Bentley Caudill

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Jacksonville Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley 2 Garneau Lounge

Description

In this "Performance Roundtable," presenters perform a short text and give a brief commentary on their performance as a lens to highlight / analyze women’s voices.

Women’s voices in twelfth-century narrative romances and in lyric compositions typically lie flat on a page, read in silence by modern solitary readers. This session lifts these voices off the page by giving them a physical presence through performance. The practice of the modern performance of medieval texts, while it does not purport to provide an accurate reconstruction of the medieval practice of courtly dramatic reading and performance, does nevertheless function as a heuristic device for a clearer understanding of the inflections and nuances of textual women’s voices. The shared experience generates not just individual but also collective, integrative interpretations. They serve as a mediation, similar to the mediation that occurred for medieval audiences, who, as Evelyn Birge Vitz indicates in Orality and Performance, “cannot help but have been affected by the performers’ interpretation” of a narrative text.

In this session, participants will perform a short passage of their choice and also offer a brief commentary concerning their performance choices and how these may serve as a basis for analysis and pedagogy. Special consideration will be given to scholars who use performance or other interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval French works. It will attract scholars in narratology, musicology, performance studies, and women’s studies. Performers will be asked to choose passages, either lyric or narrative, which contain direct address, and which represent the voices of women written by male or female authors, and women in diverse societal roles.

Simonetta Cochis

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

In Her Own Words: Twelfth-Century French Women's Voices in Performance (A Performance Roundtable)

Valley 2 Garneau Lounge

In this "Performance Roundtable," presenters perform a short text and give a brief commentary on their performance as a lens to highlight / analyze women’s voices.

Women’s voices in twelfth-century narrative romances and in lyric compositions typically lie flat on a page, read in silence by modern solitary readers. This session lifts these voices off the page by giving them a physical presence through performance. The practice of the modern performance of medieval texts, while it does not purport to provide an accurate reconstruction of the medieval practice of courtly dramatic reading and performance, does nevertheless function as a heuristic device for a clearer understanding of the inflections and nuances of textual women’s voices. The shared experience generates not just individual but also collective, integrative interpretations. They serve as a mediation, similar to the mediation that occurred for medieval audiences, who, as Evelyn Birge Vitz indicates in Orality and Performance, “cannot help but have been affected by the performers’ interpretation” of a narrative text.

In this session, participants will perform a short passage of their choice and also offer a brief commentary concerning their performance choices and how these may serve as a basis for analysis and pedagogy. Special consideration will be given to scholars who use performance or other interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval French works. It will attract scholars in narratology, musicology, performance studies, and women’s studies. Performers will be asked to choose passages, either lyric or narrative, which contain direct address, and which represent the voices of women written by male or female authors, and women in diverse societal roles.

Simonetta Cochis