Session Title

Other Monasticisms I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Sheila Bonde; Clark Maines

Organizer Affiliation

Brown Univ.; Wesleyan Univ.

Presider Name

Sheila Bonde

Paper Title 1

The French Celestine Network: Cross-Order and Lay Reform Collaboration in the Late Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Presenter 1 Name

Robert L. J. Shaw

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

Sainte-Croix-sous-Offémont: An Archaeological and Architectural Perspective on the Celestine Order

Presenter 2 Name

Arthur Panier

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Paris I–Panthéon-Sorbonne/Univ. Libre de Bruxelle

Paper Title 3

Crafting an Order: The Making of Isabelle of France's Minoresses

Presenter 3 Name

Erica Kinias

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Brown Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 2355

Description

One of the most important features of the Middle Ages, monasticism shaped, and was shaped by, art, architecture, history, literature, liturgy, theology. There were over 300 ‘orders’ active in the medieval and early modern periods. Despite this importance and ubiquity, our approach to this major sub-field is lacking in both breadth and depth, and our understanding of monasticism has been skewed by a scholarly imbalance in study and publication. The issue of alternative forms of monastic life was raised by Roberta Gilchrist in her book entitled: Contemplation and Action: The Other Monasticism. Her study focused on monastic communities traditionally neglected by historians and archaeologists: infirmaries, hospitals, leprosaria and almhouses, military orders, hermitages and houses for women. Our review of articles published in Speculum in 1988 revealed that nearly three-quarters of those publications had been devoted to a very restricted set of monastic orders. This study was followed by another published in 2004 which revealed that the pattern remained unchanged over the intervening 16 years. Survey books in history and art history privilege the Cistercians, Cluniacs, independent Benedictines, and a handful of other communities. Orders such as the Val des Écoliers, Celestines, Valliscaulians, Augustinians, Arrouasians, Tironensians and even Victorines and Praemonstratensians require more attention if we are to have a fuller and more nuanced understanding of the place of monasticism in the middle ages. These sessions include papers by scholars from history, art history, archaeology and other fields that engage with a broader range of monastic questions and houses.

Robert Clark Maines

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Other Monasticisms I

Schneider 2355

One of the most important features of the Middle Ages, monasticism shaped, and was shaped by, art, architecture, history, literature, liturgy, theology. There were over 300 ‘orders’ active in the medieval and early modern periods. Despite this importance and ubiquity, our approach to this major sub-field is lacking in both breadth and depth, and our understanding of monasticism has been skewed by a scholarly imbalance in study and publication. The issue of alternative forms of monastic life was raised by Roberta Gilchrist in her book entitled: Contemplation and Action: The Other Monasticism. Her study focused on monastic communities traditionally neglected by historians and archaeologists: infirmaries, hospitals, leprosaria and almhouses, military orders, hermitages and houses for women. Our review of articles published in Speculum in 1988 revealed that nearly three-quarters of those publications had been devoted to a very restricted set of monastic orders. This study was followed by another published in 2004 which revealed that the pattern remained unchanged over the intervening 16 years. Survey books in history and art history privilege the Cistercians, Cluniacs, independent Benedictines, and a handful of other communities. Orders such as the Val des Écoliers, Celestines, Valliscaulians, Augustinians, Arrouasians, Tironensians and even Victorines and Praemonstratensians require more attention if we are to have a fuller and more nuanced understanding of the place of monasticism in the middle ages. These sessions include papers by scholars from history, art history, archaeology and other fields that engage with a broader range of monastic questions and houses.

Robert Clark Maines