Session Title

Pauline Stafford's Queens, Concubines, and Dowagers Thirty-Five Years Later (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Prosopography

Organizer Name

Valerie L. Garver

Organizer Affiliation

Northern Illinois Univ.

Presider Name

Valerie L. Garver

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

Charlotte Cartwright

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Christopher Newport Univ.

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Theresa Earenfight

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Seattle Univ.

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

Phyllis G. Jestice

Presenter 3 Affiliation

College of Charleston

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Lucy K. Pick

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Dana M. Polanichka

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Wheaton College

Start Date

13-5-2018 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

This roundtable session will consider the influence and importance of Pauline Stafford’s Queens, Concubines, and Dowagers: the King’s Wife in the Early Middle Ages (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1983, repr. 2000) thirty-five years after its initial publication. Early on the book earned widespread international regard. Few books have had more lasting influence over the last four decades within the fields of women’s history, early medieval history, family history, the history of power, and, of course, medieval propospography. Because Stafford’s book looked across traditional geographic and political divides in the early medieval era, she inspired scholars working in varied parts of Europe and on different periods. Even late medievalists have credited and continue to hail Stafford’s originality and innovative methodology.

Valerie L. Garver

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May 13th, 10:30 AM

Pauline Stafford's Queens, Concubines, and Dowagers Thirty-Five Years Later (A Roundtable)

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

This roundtable session will consider the influence and importance of Pauline Stafford’s Queens, Concubines, and Dowagers: the King’s Wife in the Early Middle Ages (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1983, repr. 2000) thirty-five years after its initial publication. Early on the book earned widespread international regard. Few books have had more lasting influence over the last four decades within the fields of women’s history, early medieval history, family history, the history of power, and, of course, medieval propospography. Because Stafford’s book looked across traditional geographic and political divides in the early medieval era, she inspired scholars working in varied parts of Europe and on different periods. Even late medievalists have credited and continue to hail Stafford’s originality and innovative methodology.

Valerie L. Garver