Session Title

Records of Early English Drama North-East: Five Years In

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of English Studies, Durham Univ.

Organizer Name

Diana Wyatt

Organizer Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Presider Name

Alexandra Johnston

Presider Affiliation

Records of Early English Drama

Paper Title 1

Traveling Players on the North Yorkshire Moors

Presenter 1 Name

David Klausner

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Records of Early English Drama

Paper Title 2

The Murderous Mumming, and Other Unexpected Finds in the East Riding of Yorkshire

Presenter 2 Name

Diana Wyatt

Paper Title 3

Medieval Records for Early English Drama in Durham: Entertaining Town and Gown in the Palatinate

Presenter 3 Name

Mark C. Chambers

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2018 10:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

As REED N-E nears the five-year mark (September 2018), it seems particularly important to reflect on the extraordinary range and richness of the evidence that has been found over the life of the project. The manuscripts surveyed are themselves a wide variety of types of document, ranging from wills, letters and diaries to household manuals, and from ecclesiastical visitation books and accounts to local authority minutes and ordinances. The information yielded has been equally remarkable in the range of performance types witnessed, and shows that even within the region the traditions could differ noticeably from county to county and even from one Riding of Yorkshire to another. The papers in this session will aim to focus on examples of this great range of both documentary sources and performance types, to demonstrate how the REED N-E evidence will make a new and significant contribution to our understanding of early English performance.

Diana Wyatt

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May 13th, 10:30 AM

Records of Early English Drama North-East: Five Years In

Fetzer 2020

As REED N-E nears the five-year mark (September 2018), it seems particularly important to reflect on the extraordinary range and richness of the evidence that has been found over the life of the project. The manuscripts surveyed are themselves a wide variety of types of document, ranging from wills, letters and diaries to household manuals, and from ecclesiastical visitation books and accounts to local authority minutes and ordinances. The information yielded has been equally remarkable in the range of performance types witnessed, and shows that even within the region the traditions could differ noticeably from county to county and even from one Riding of Yorkshire to another. The papers in this session will aim to focus on examples of this great range of both documentary sources and performance types, to demonstrate how the REED N-E evidence will make a new and significant contribution to our understanding of early English performance.

Diana Wyatt