Session Title

Medieval Waterways

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Pacific

Organizer Name

Miranda Wilcox

Organizer Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Presider Name

Miranda Wilcox

Paper Title 1

Arts on the Waterways: Encountering the Early Medieval Past on British Canals and Rivers

Presenter 1 Name

Beth Whalley

Presenter 1 Affiliation

King's College London

Paper Title 2

Ditches, Wheels, und Druppenval: Keeping the Water out of the Records in Medieval Osnabrück, 1250-1400

Presenter 2 Name

Nora Thorburn

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

London’s Necessary Scapegoats: Petermen and Right of Way on the Medieval Thames

Presenter 3 Name

Sarah Crover

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Paper Title 4

Waterways and Carriage Practices in the Building Trades of Henry VIII's England

Presenter 4 Name

Charlotte A. Stanford

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Sangren 1720

Description

Waterways were the mainstay of travel, communication, and commerce in the Middle Ages. Roots of medieval economies, landscape management, agricultural production, and settlement patterns can be traced to waterway use. Routes of migration, trade, pilgrimage, and conquest align with networks of navigable rivers, canals, and sea crossings. These culturally and geographically fluid landscapes also served as borders and conduits in religious and literary imaginaries.

Miranda Wilcox

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Waterways

Sangren 1720

Waterways were the mainstay of travel, communication, and commerce in the Middle Ages. Roots of medieval economies, landscape management, agricultural production, and settlement patterns can be traced to waterway use. Routes of migration, trade, pilgrimage, and conquest align with networks of navigable rivers, canals, and sea crossings. These culturally and geographically fluid landscapes also served as borders and conduits in religious and literary imaginaries.

Miranda Wilcox