Session Title

Resistant Networks

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Univ. of St. Andrews

Organizer Name

Bettina Bildhauer

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of St. Andrews

Presider Name

Björn Klaus Buschbeck

Presider Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 1

Thinking with Networks: Political and Cultural Agency in Literature of the Welsh Marches

Presenter 1 Name

Matthew Lampitt

Presenter 1 Affiliation

King’s College London

Paper Title 2

Net Narratives

Presenter 2 Name

Bettina Bildhauer

Paper Title 3

The Internet of Manuscripts

Presenter 3 Name

Andrew Prescott

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Glasgow

Start Date

11-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Sangren 1710

Description

Network studies are taking the humanities, including medieval studies, by storm – everything from the brain to a plant, from language evolution to subject-object-relations is rethought in terms of the network metaphor. This session aims to dig deeper into the resistant materiality behind these network metaphors, into the more agential role they afford to things and texts, and into their links to the internet as the paradigmatic network. Andrew Prescott, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Glasgow, in ‘The Internet of Manuscripts’ shows how new electronic technologies enable us to wire up and network actual manuscripts in a library or museum space, using for example RFID chips or artcodes to record the history and relationships of manuscripts, so that manuscripts become a digital network in their own right. Matthew Lampitt, PhD student in French at King’s College London, in his paper ‘Thinking with Networks: Political and Cultural Agency in Literature of the Welsh Marches’ investigates how thinking with networks enables scholars to restore political and cultural agency and resistance to texts and regions traditionally considered peripheral, in this case the Welsh Marches. Bettina Bildhauer (SAIMS, organiser) in ‘Net narratives’ analyses the medieval prehistory of the contemporary craze for the network metaphor: the net metaphor. The frequent association of nets with invisibility, material resistance and danger might persist in contemporary anxieties about the internet. (SIGNED) Bettina Bildhauer

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Resistant Networks

Sangren 1710

Network studies are taking the humanities, including medieval studies, by storm – everything from the brain to a plant, from language evolution to subject-object-relations is rethought in terms of the network metaphor. This session aims to dig deeper into the resistant materiality behind these network metaphors, into the more agential role they afford to things and texts, and into their links to the internet as the paradigmatic network. Andrew Prescott, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Glasgow, in ‘The Internet of Manuscripts’ shows how new electronic technologies enable us to wire up and network actual manuscripts in a library or museum space, using for example RFID chips or artcodes to record the history and relationships of manuscripts, so that manuscripts become a digital network in their own right. Matthew Lampitt, PhD student in French at King’s College London, in his paper ‘Thinking with Networks: Political and Cultural Agency in Literature of the Welsh Marches’ investigates how thinking with networks enables scholars to restore political and cultural agency and resistance to texts and regions traditionally considered peripheral, in this case the Welsh Marches. Bettina Bildhauer (SAIMS, organiser) in ‘Net narratives’ analyses the medieval prehistory of the contemporary craze for the network metaphor: the net metaphor. The frequent association of nets with invisibility, material resistance and danger might persist in contemporary anxieties about the internet. (SIGNED) Bettina Bildhauer