Session Title

Medieval Diversity in the Core Curriculum (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Fellowship of Medievalists of Color (MOC)

Organizer Name

Nicole Lopez-Jantzen

Organizer Affiliation

Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Presider Name

Shyama Rajendran

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Wyoming

Paper Title 1

Code Switch: Repurposing Digital Tools to Explore Diversity in the Medieval World

Presenter 1 Name

Andrea Myers Achi

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Institute of Fine Arts, New York Univ.

Paper Title 2

Teaching Africa in the Medieval Art History Survey

Presenter 2 Name

Luke Fidler

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 3

Straddling the Divide: Leading Core When No One Agrees

Presenter 3 Name

Meg Worley

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Colgate Univ.

Paper Title 4

The Global View: Teaching Medieval Europe, Persia, and Japan in the Core Curriculum

Presenter 4 Name

Sarah McNamer

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Georgetown Univ.

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Kim Klimek

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Metropolitan State Univ. of Denver

Paper Title 6

Whose Past Is It? Confronting and Broadening Ideas of the Middle Ages and Western Civilization in the History Core

Presenter 6 Name

Nicole Lopez-Jantzen

Start Date

11-5-2018 3:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1910

Description

Works of medieval (European) literature, history, art history, and philosophy are often included in “core” or “general education” sequences for undergraduates: Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, and Chaucer, to name a few. Are "Great Works" or "Western Civilization" useful frameworks for discussing the complexity of the medieval past and medieval works in contemporary society? How does one address race when traditional, more “prestigious” notions of the curriculum shape our educational benchmarks? This roundtable hopes to explore ways to expand thinking about the curriculum even within a white male cultural tradition: for instance, one may consider North African contexts for Augustine, Arabic influences on Aquinas, Muslim figures in Dante, Persian and Islamicate intertexts for Chaucer’s multi-voiced storytelling. How can global orientations and a diversified curriculum create a rich, dynamic cultural context for the Western tradition?

Nicole Lopez-Jantzen

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 11th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Diversity in the Core Curriculum (A Roundtable)

Sangren 1910

Works of medieval (European) literature, history, art history, and philosophy are often included in “core” or “general education” sequences for undergraduates: Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, and Chaucer, to name a few. Are "Great Works" or "Western Civilization" useful frameworks for discussing the complexity of the medieval past and medieval works in contemporary society? How does one address race when traditional, more “prestigious” notions of the curriculum shape our educational benchmarks? This roundtable hopes to explore ways to expand thinking about the curriculum even within a white male cultural tradition: for instance, one may consider North African contexts for Augustine, Arabic influences on Aquinas, Muslim figures in Dante, Persian and Islamicate intertexts for Chaucer’s multi-voiced storytelling. How can global orientations and a diversified curriculum create a rich, dynamic cultural context for the Western tradition?

Nicole Lopez-Jantzen