Session Title

Hispano-Romance Historical Linguistics and Lexicography: A Tribute to John J. Nitti I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies (HSMS)

Organizer Name

Pablo Pastrana-Pérez

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Sonia Kania

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Arlington

Paper Title 1

Cuestiones pendientes sobre la historia de convusco y su paradigma

Presenter 1 Name

Andrea Sánchez Vicente

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 2

El desarrollo de MULTUM/MULTO en español: de adverbio a cuantificador

Presenter 2 Name

Fernando Tejedo-Herrero

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 3

Reconsidering Castellano D(e)recho

Presenter 3 Name

Donald N. Tuten

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Emory Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

John J. Nitti, Emeritus Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and honorary member of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language, is a world renown pioneer in the use of computers in lexicography and linguistic research. After his first major grant from the NEH in 1972, he founded the Old Spanish Dictionary project, in which dozens of graduate students in Romance Linguistics worked for thirty years under his careful supervision. With help from his mentor, Lloyd Kasten, John J. Nitti was also the driving force behind the creation of the Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies in 1975, which has been publishing countless paleographic transcriptions of Old Spanish texts ever since. The HSMS, now under the auspices of the Hispanic Society of America in New York City, continues to be an important publisher of innovative research in Ibero-Medieval studies. Nitti is also responsible for the creation of the Bibliography of Old Spanish Texts, or BOOST, which has been much expanded into PhiloBiblon since its move to the University of California-Berkeley. Aside for his colossal contribution in the early application of computers to the Humanities, Nitti's numerous publications, which includesThe Electronic Texts and Concordances of Medieval Navarro-Aragonese Manuscripts (1997) and the Dictionario de la prosa castellana del Rey Alfonso X (2002), have become indispensable research tools for scholars the world over. This is one of two sessions in honor of John J. Nitti, which seek to bring together innovative research on any aspect of Hispano-Romance historical linguistics and lexicography.

Pablo M. Pastrana-Pérez

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Hispano-Romance Historical Linguistics and Lexicography: A Tribute to John J. Nitti I

Fetzer 2016

John J. Nitti, Emeritus Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and honorary member of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language, is a world renown pioneer in the use of computers in lexicography and linguistic research. After his first major grant from the NEH in 1972, he founded the Old Spanish Dictionary project, in which dozens of graduate students in Romance Linguistics worked for thirty years under his careful supervision. With help from his mentor, Lloyd Kasten, John J. Nitti was also the driving force behind the creation of the Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies in 1975, which has been publishing countless paleographic transcriptions of Old Spanish texts ever since. The HSMS, now under the auspices of the Hispanic Society of America in New York City, continues to be an important publisher of innovative research in Ibero-Medieval studies. Nitti is also responsible for the creation of the Bibliography of Old Spanish Texts, or BOOST, which has been much expanded into PhiloBiblon since its move to the University of California-Berkeley. Aside for his colossal contribution in the early application of computers to the Humanities, Nitti's numerous publications, which includesThe Electronic Texts and Concordances of Medieval Navarro-Aragonese Manuscripts (1997) and the Dictionario de la prosa castellana del Rey Alfonso X (2002), have become indispensable research tools for scholars the world over. This is one of two sessions in honor of John J. Nitti, which seek to bring together innovative research on any aspect of Hispano-Romance historical linguistics and lexicography.

Pablo M. Pastrana-Pérez