Session Title

Preach It, Sister! A Roundtable about Women and Homiletics

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics (SSASH)

Organizer Name

Brandon W. Hawk

Organizer Affiliation

Rhode Island College

Presider Name

M. Breann Leake

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Connecticut

Paper Title 1

Homiletics: Insular Perspectives

Presenter 1 Name

Kristen Carella

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Assumption College

Paper Title 2

Women and Witchcraft in Late Anglo-Saxon Homiletics

Presenter 2 Name

Jill Hamilton Clements

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Alabama-Birmingham

Paper Title 3

The Impact of the Lynne Grundy Memorial Trust: A Twenty-Year Retrospective

Presenter 3 Name

Jill Fitzgerald

Presenter 3 Affiliation

United States Naval Academy

Paper Title 4

Wundorlice Wif: Women as Universal Models in Ælfric's Homilies and Anglo-Saxon Studies

Presenter 4 Name

Rachel Elizabeth Grabowski

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Paper Title 5

Sisters in Preaching: Transhistorical Networks in Homiletics

Presenter 5 Name

Johanna Kramer

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 6

The Included Excluded: Women and Jews in Old English Homilies

Presenter 6 Name

Samantha Zacher

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2018 7:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

2018 marks the 25th anniversary of the publication of Janet Bately’s handlist titled Anonymous Old English Homilies: A Preliminary Bibliography of Source Studies (1993), which remains an invaluable resource in the field. Yet this publication is just one representative of how women have been integral to the study of Anglo-Saxon preaching. For example, we also continue to rely on foundational editions and studies by Dorothy Bethurum, Mary Clayton, Helen Foxhall Forbes, Mechthild Gretsch, Joyce Hill, Susan Irvine, Clare Lees, Joyce Tally Lionarons, Mary Swan, Elaine Treharne, Dorothy Whitelock, and Samantha Zacher. The past decade has brought about the publications of major books by women featuring sermons, such as Zacher’s Preaching the Converted: The Style and Rhetoric of the Vercelli Book Homilies (2009); Lionarons’s The Homiletic Writings of Archbishop Wulfstan (2010); Treharne’s Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020-1220 (2012); and Forbes’s Heaven and Earth in Anglo‑Saxon England: Theology and Society in an Age of Faith (2013). The proposed roundtable will feature reflections about the work of women on Anglo-Saxon homiletics, allowing for not only showcasing past scholarship but also a forum for lively discussion of future directions. At a time when the study of gender is at the foreground in Anglo-Saxon studies, this roundtable will provide an intervention in historiography meant to celebrate the legacy of women in the field.

Brandon W. Hawk

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May 10th, 7:30 PM

Preach It, Sister! A Roundtable about Women and Homiletics

Fetzer 1010

2018 marks the 25th anniversary of the publication of Janet Bately’s handlist titled Anonymous Old English Homilies: A Preliminary Bibliography of Source Studies (1993), which remains an invaluable resource in the field. Yet this publication is just one representative of how women have been integral to the study of Anglo-Saxon preaching. For example, we also continue to rely on foundational editions and studies by Dorothy Bethurum, Mary Clayton, Helen Foxhall Forbes, Mechthild Gretsch, Joyce Hill, Susan Irvine, Clare Lees, Joyce Tally Lionarons, Mary Swan, Elaine Treharne, Dorothy Whitelock, and Samantha Zacher. The past decade has brought about the publications of major books by women featuring sermons, such as Zacher’s Preaching the Converted: The Style and Rhetoric of the Vercelli Book Homilies (2009); Lionarons’s The Homiletic Writings of Archbishop Wulfstan (2010); Treharne’s Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020-1220 (2012); and Forbes’s Heaven and Earth in Anglo‑Saxon England: Theology and Society in an Age of Faith (2013). The proposed roundtable will feature reflections about the work of women on Anglo-Saxon homiletics, allowing for not only showcasing past scholarship but also a forum for lively discussion of future directions. At a time when the study of gender is at the foreground in Anglo-Saxon studies, this roundtable will provide an intervention in historiography meant to celebrate the legacy of women in the field.

Brandon W. Hawk