Session Title

New Questions about Saint Gertrude the Great's The Herald of God’s Loving-Kindness Raised by the Discovery of Leipzig Ms. 827

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies, Western Michigan Univ.; Committee for the Nomination of St. Gertrude as a Doctor of the Church

Organizer Name

Susan M. B. Steuer

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Marsha L. Dutton

Presider Affiliation

Ohio Univ.

Paper Title 1

Scenes of Writing, Figurations of Authorship: A Literature Historian's Reflections on the Veracity of the Passages Recounting the Textual Genesis of the Special Edition of Gertrude of Helfta's Legatus divinae pietatis

Presenter 1 Name

Balázs Nemes

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Albert-Ludwigs-Univ. Freiburg

Paper Title 2

The Priority of the Leipzig Version of the Legatus divinae pietatis

Presenter 2 Name

Alexandra Barratt

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Waikato

Paper Title 3

The Process of Composition of Legatus divinae pietatis: An Overview

Presenter 3 Name

Ana Laura Forastieri OCSO

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Monasterio Madre de Cristo

Paper Title 4

German-English Translator

Presenter 4 Name

Cornelia Oefelein

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

12-5-2018 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1040

Description

Leipzig Ms. 827 was rediscovered in 2008. Paleographic studies date the codex to the beginning of the 14th century, making it the oldest-known manuscript of The Herald, copied very shortly after the Gertrude’s death. The Leipzig codex contains some previously unknown portions of the work, while some portions of the more familiar version of the work are absent from the newly discovered codex. Papers in this session will explore the implications of this discovery

Susan Steuer

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

New Questions about Saint Gertrude the Great's The Herald of God’s Loving-Kindness Raised by the Discovery of Leipzig Ms. 827

Fetzer 1040

Leipzig Ms. 827 was rediscovered in 2008. Paleographic studies date the codex to the beginning of the 14th century, making it the oldest-known manuscript of The Herald, copied very shortly after the Gertrude’s death. The Leipzig codex contains some previously unknown portions of the work, while some portions of the more familiar version of the work are absent from the newly discovered codex. Papers in this session will explore the implications of this discovery

Susan Steuer