Session Title

Mappings II: Text and Image and/on Medieval Maps

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Felicitas Schmieder

Organizer Affiliation

FernUniv. in Hagen

Presider Name

Dan Terkla

Presider Affiliation

Illinois Wesleyan Univ.

Paper Title 1

Hyperspectral Image Analysis of the Gough Map of Britain

Presenter 1 Name

Di Bai

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Rochester Institute of Technology

Paper Title 2

Mapping the Local World of Saint Augustine's Abbey: Thomas Elmham's Transformative Cartography

Presenter 2 Name

Beth Kaneko

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

The Kingdom of Sheba in the Far East: Suggestions from Maps and Travel Accounts

Presenter 3 Name

Irene Malfatto

Presenter 3 Affiliation

John Carter Brown Library

Start Date

11-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1145

Description

The extent to which medieval mapmakers used words and images to re-present their world varies from map to map and from one map type to another. There are verbal maps, schematic maps, maps that are primarily pictorial, and still others that provide viewers with complex word-and-image information hybrids. Speakers in this session will discuss ways in which various types of map might have been understood by their medieval viewers, what information they might have conveyed to those viewers, and how their words and/or images might have conveyed that information.

Daniel Terkla

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Mappings II: Text and Image and/on Medieval Maps

Schneider 1145

The extent to which medieval mapmakers used words and images to re-present their world varies from map to map and from one map type to another. There are verbal maps, schematic maps, maps that are primarily pictorial, and still others that provide viewers with complex word-and-image information hybrids. Speakers in this session will discuss ways in which various types of map might have been understood by their medieval viewers, what information they might have conveyed to those viewers, and how their words and/or images might have conveyed that information.

Daniel Terkla