Session Title

Mappings I: Mappa Memoriae: Medieval Maps and Memory

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Dan Terkla

Organizer Affiliation

Illinois Wesleyan Univ.

Presider Name

Asa Simon Mittman

Presider Affiliation

California State Univ.-Chico/Material Collective

Paper Title 1

A Landscape of Christian Memories: Late Medieval Mappae Mundi as Pilgrimage Guides?

Presenter 1 Name

Felicitas Schmieder

Presenter 1 Affiliation

FernUniv. in Hagen

Paper Title 2

Historical Memory and the First Detailed Map of Hungary (1528)

Presenter 2 Name

András Vadas

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Eötvös Loránd Univ./Central European Univ.

Paper Title 3

Re-enacting the Past: Temporality and Liminal Spaces on the Anglo-Saxon Cotton Map

Presenter 3 Name

Margaret Tedford

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Queen's Univ. Belfast

Start Date

11-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1145

Description

Medieval world maps were both synchronic and diachronic repositories of historia, of chapters from the human story. Maps were paired with complementary written texts and enabled users to geo-locate people, places, and events from that story, as it played out simultaneously and chronologically across the map’s surface. Geo-location also enabled the visualization and memorization of written and mapped information and led to the creation of comprehensive cognitive maps. Speakers in this session will discuss medieval mnemonic processes, maps’ mnemonic functions, and the myriad uses of those processes, functions, and the information they produced.

Dan Terkla

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Mappings I: Mappa Memoriae: Medieval Maps and Memory

Schneider 1145

Medieval world maps were both synchronic and diachronic repositories of historia, of chapters from the human story. Maps were paired with complementary written texts and enabled users to geo-locate people, places, and events from that story, as it played out simultaneously and chronologically across the map’s surface. Geo-location also enabled the visualization and memorization of written and mapped information and led to the creation of comprehensive cognitive maps. Speakers in this session will discuss medieval mnemonic processes, maps’ mnemonic functions, and the myriad uses of those processes, functions, and the information they produced.

Dan Terkla