Session Title

The Role of Nature and the Body in the Byzantine Tradition of Prayer

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Romanian Institute of Orthodox Theology and Spirituality of New York

Organizer Name

Alina N. Feld

Organizer Affiliation

Hofstra Univ./General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church

Presider Name

Theodor Damian

Presider Affiliation

Metropolitan College of New York

Paper Title 1

"The Spirit indeed is willing but the flesh is weak": The Care of the Body in the Paintings of the Monastic Refectory in Apollonia (Albania)

Presenter 1 Name

Judith Soria

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Monde Byzantin

Paper Title 2

Prayer and Its Efficacy according to Jamblichus and Proclus

Presenter 2 Name

Sergey Trostyanskiy

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York

Paper Title 3

Rethinking Apatheia: Nilus of Ancyra on Navigating the Body

Presenter 3 Name

Clair McPherson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church

Paper Title 4

The Body Sublime in Sikh Thought: Animal, Child, Woman, Drunk, Insane

Presenter 4 Name

Balbinder Singh Bhogal

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Hofstra Univ.

Paper Title 5

Eschatological Body in Hesychasm and Hinduism

Presenter 5 Name

Alina N. Feld

Start Date

12-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

We are witnessing a resurgence of interest in the role of the body and its spiritual senses within the Christian tradition. Recent studies in the phenomenology and hermeneutics of the body, such as Sarah Coakley and Paul L. Gavrilyuk, The Spiritual Senses: Perceiving God in Western Christianity (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Richard Kearney and Brian Treanor, Carnal Hermeneutics (Fordham University Press, 2015) have initiated an intense philosophical conversation on the topic while circumscribing it to the Western tradition. The present session introduces still unmapped domains of interest to the project underway. The Byzantine tradition of prayer is one of these sine qua non domains of investigation for the role of the body in the life of the spirit. It is revealing not only within the Christian world but also central to the movement of the theological turn in phenomenology as well as to the study of comparative mysticism east and west, and inter-religious theo-poetics.

The session is a proper forum for thinking further, mapping and investigating this new territory. Presenters will engage in philosophical reflection on human nature (anthropology, psychology, sociology), art, the relation between the human and the divine (theology), human and non-human nature (ecotheology), as well as the relation between Western and Eastern religious and mystical traditions (Hindu and Sikh).

Alina N. Feld

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

The Role of Nature and the Body in the Byzantine Tradition of Prayer

Bernhard 204

We are witnessing a resurgence of interest in the role of the body and its spiritual senses within the Christian tradition. Recent studies in the phenomenology and hermeneutics of the body, such as Sarah Coakley and Paul L. Gavrilyuk, The Spiritual Senses: Perceiving God in Western Christianity (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Richard Kearney and Brian Treanor, Carnal Hermeneutics (Fordham University Press, 2015) have initiated an intense philosophical conversation on the topic while circumscribing it to the Western tradition. The present session introduces still unmapped domains of interest to the project underway. The Byzantine tradition of prayer is one of these sine qua non domains of investigation for the role of the body in the life of the spirit. It is revealing not only within the Christian world but also central to the movement of the theological turn in phenomenology as well as to the study of comparative mysticism east and west, and inter-religious theo-poetics.

The session is a proper forum for thinking further, mapping and investigating this new territory. Presenters will engage in philosophical reflection on human nature (anthropology, psychology, sociology), art, the relation between the human and the divine (theology), human and non-human nature (ecotheology), as well as the relation between Western and Eastern religious and mystical traditions (Hindu and Sikh).

Alina N. Feld