Session Title

Justice Gone Awry in Medieval Art and Culture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Toy-Fung Tung

Organizer Affiliation

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Presider Name

Toy-Fung Tung

Paper Title 1

Is It Unlawful for a Man to Mourn for His Wife? Widowhood, Misogyny,and the Double Standard in the Lamentations of "Matheolus"

Presenter 1 Name

Linda Burke

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Elmhurst College

Paper Title 2

Madonna Isabella Astride Lambertuccio's Horse: Setting the Pace in Decameron 7.6

Presenter 2 Name

Margaret Escher

Presenter 2 Affiliation

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Paper Title 3

The Madonna, a Medieval Advocate for Justice: An Examination through Art, Song, and Prayer

Presenter 3 Name

Marilyn Gasparini

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

11-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1720

Description

How were miscarriages of justice portrayed in different medieval literary genres, and also in history, law, and the arts? Did the medieval portrayal of justice and injustice vary depending on genre conventions, and even differences within the same genre, for example the Tristan and Lancelot tales? What about works like Malory’s, Chaucer’s, and Christine de Pizan’s that cross genre boundaries? In what way was the concept of justice affected by the polemical aims of historiography or the politics of law? How was injustice portrayed in art versus literary works? This interdisciplinary panel queries whether a concept of ideal justice broadly prevailed in medieval culture, or whether it belonged only to the domain of theologians and canon lawyers. Did the medieval portrayal of justice and injustice vary depending on genre conventions, and even differences within the same genre? In what way was the concept of justice affected by the polemical aims of historiography or the politics of law? Of special interest is the question of whether Foucault’s characterization of a “philosophico-juridical discourse” is substantiated in specific works and contexts from the Middle Ages to the seventeenth-century.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Justice Gone Awry in Medieval Art and Culture

Sangren 1720

How were miscarriages of justice portrayed in different medieval literary genres, and also in history, law, and the arts? Did the medieval portrayal of justice and injustice vary depending on genre conventions, and even differences within the same genre, for example the Tristan and Lancelot tales? What about works like Malory’s, Chaucer’s, and Christine de Pizan’s that cross genre boundaries? In what way was the concept of justice affected by the polemical aims of historiography or the politics of law? How was injustice portrayed in art versus literary works? This interdisciplinary panel queries whether a concept of ideal justice broadly prevailed in medieval culture, or whether it belonged only to the domain of theologians and canon lawyers. Did the medieval portrayal of justice and injustice vary depending on genre conventions, and even differences within the same genre? In what way was the concept of justice affected by the polemical aims of historiography or the politics of law? Of special interest is the question of whether Foucault’s characterization of a “philosophico-juridical discourse” is substantiated in specific works and contexts from the Middle Ages to the seventeenth-century.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon