Session Title

Rethinking the Coverage Model in the History of English Language Course (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Audrey Becker

Organizer Affiliation

Marygrove College

Presider Name

Audrey Becker

Paper Title 1

Finding the Language of Our Past in Twentieth-Century Conversations: A Methods Approach to Teaching History of English

Presenter 1 Name

Trini Stickle; Kelly D. Abrams

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Western Kentucky Univ.; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 2

Teaching HEL via Dictionaries and Primary (Literary) Texts

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew Brumit

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Mary

Paper Title 3

A Linguistic Approach to Non-chronological Sequencing in the History of the English Language

Presenter 3 Name

Daniel R. Davis

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Dearborn

Paper Title 4

Rethinking the History of Writing . . . in the History of English

Presenter 4 Name

Eric Bryan

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology

Paper Title 5

Online, Redesigned, Theme-based, and Future-Focused: My New HEL Course

Presenter 5 Name

Margaret Hostetler

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Start Date

11-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Sangren 1740

Description

Compressing 1500 years of English language history into a 14-week semester poses no shortage of challenges. Not only does the traditional History of the English Language (HEL) course aim to impart foundational knowledge from a range of disciplines—linguistics, geography, social and political history, grammar, and literature—but content-dense textbooks presuppose copious knowledge with which many students—especially North American students—have limited familiarity. In “The End of the History Survey Course: The Rise and Fall of the Coverage Model” (2011) Joel Sipriss & David Voelker trace a century-long academic debate on the merits and limitations of the “default” coverage model, a model which privileges content knowledge and facts over disciplinary methods and critical thinking. Their informed arguments for “[dislodging] the coverage model” in the history survey course may productively be applied to the HEL course. This roundtable panel aims to reassess the coverage model and examine the efficacy of innovative approaches to teaching Old, Middle, and Early Modern English as part of the HEL course, featuring papers that evaluate HEL course design and/or explore pedagogies which displace or supplement the conventional coverage model in the teaching of HEL.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Rethinking the Coverage Model in the History of English Language Course (A Roundtable)

Sangren 1740

Compressing 1500 years of English language history into a 14-week semester poses no shortage of challenges. Not only does the traditional History of the English Language (HEL) course aim to impart foundational knowledge from a range of disciplines—linguistics, geography, social and political history, grammar, and literature—but content-dense textbooks presuppose copious knowledge with which many students—especially North American students—have limited familiarity. In “The End of the History Survey Course: The Rise and Fall of the Coverage Model” (2011) Joel Sipriss & David Voelker trace a century-long academic debate on the merits and limitations of the “default” coverage model, a model which privileges content knowledge and facts over disciplinary methods and critical thinking. Their informed arguments for “[dislodging] the coverage model” in the history survey course may productively be applied to the HEL course. This roundtable panel aims to reassess the coverage model and examine the efficacy of innovative approaches to teaching Old, Middle, and Early Modern English as part of the HEL course, featuring papers that evaluate HEL course design and/or explore pedagogies which displace or supplement the conventional coverage model in the teaching of HEL.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon