Session Title

Carolingian Connections

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Sources of Anglo-Saxon Literary Culture

Organizer Name

Benjamin Weber

Organizer Affiliation

Wheaton College, Illinois

Presider Name

Benjamin Weber

Paper Title 1

The Carolingian Connections of Anglo-Saxon Martyrologies

Presenter 1 Name

Christine Rauer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of St. Andrews

Paper Title 2

Catechism at Canterbury: Examining Carolingian Connections in Royal 8.C.III

Presenter 2 Name

Miranda Wilcox

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Paper Title 3

Monks and Manuscripts: The Anglo-Saxon Use of Five Carolingian Reform Texts

Presenter 3 Name

Deanna Brook's

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Start Date

May 2018

Session Location

Schneider 1145

Description

This session includes papers that consider avenues of influence and exchange between Anglo-Saxon England and Carolingian Europe. Beginning with Alcuin in 782, ideas, texts and people moved freely between Anglo-Saxon England and the Frankish empire, with profound implications for both cultures. Source study, an approach dedicated to elucidating connections among texts, remains an important tool for scholars seeking deeper understanding of these debts, and this panel will bring together papers committed to doing this important work. The papers in this session, therefore, trace one or more of the many textual and intellectual connections between Anglo-Saxon England and Carolingian Europe.

Benjamin D. Weber

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 1:30 PM

Carolingian Connections

Schneider 1145

This session includes papers that consider avenues of influence and exchange between Anglo-Saxon England and Carolingian Europe. Beginning with Alcuin in 782, ideas, texts and people moved freely between Anglo-Saxon England and the Frankish empire, with profound implications for both cultures. Source study, an approach dedicated to elucidating connections among texts, remains an important tool for scholars seeking deeper understanding of these debts, and this panel will bring together papers committed to doing this important work. The papers in this session, therefore, trace one or more of the many textual and intellectual connections between Anglo-Saxon England and Carolingian Europe.

Benjamin D. Weber