Session Title

Memory: Public Display and Material Evidences I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre d'études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM)

Organizer Name

Vincent Debiais

Organizer Affiliation

CRH-AHLoMA (EHESS/CNRS), Paris

Presider Name

Sarah Ann Long

Presider Affiliation

Michigan State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Saint Agnes of Rome, the Pope, and the "Purpuresque Pavo": Memory Issues of the Apse Mosaic of Santa Agnese fuori le mura (625-638)

Presenter 1 Name

Raphaël Demès

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. de Bourgogne Franche-Comté

Paper Title 2

Epigraphic Programs in Almoravid Constructions: The Commemoration of the Emirs' Supremacy

Presenter 2 Name

María Marcos Cobaleda

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Málaga

Paper Title 3

The Lapidary Obituary of Plaimpied-Givaudins: Technical Memory of the Canons

Presenter 3 Name

Thierry Grégor

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. de Poitiers

Paper Title 4

The Lapidary Obituary of Plaimpied-Givaudins: Textual Memory of the Canons

Presenter 4 Name

Estelle Ingrand-Varenne

Presenter 4 Affiliation

CNRS-CESCM Poitiers

Start Date

13-5-2018 8:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

The two sessions cosponsored by the IMS-Paris and the CESCM-Poitiers aim to explore how medieval men and women used material devices, artefacts, and inscriptions to stage the memory of people and facts in public spaces.

In the perspective of Oexle’s seminal work, participants are invited to elaborate on the meaning and shape of public monuments erected for individual or institutional commemorations, and on the effect of such devices in the collective construction of past. Commemorative inscriptions, statues, fountains, columns translate memory into material signs, footprints of the past in medieval landscapes. In the other hand, public ceremonies, processions and liturgical celebrations need provisional constructions and displays to perform the public and demonstrative side of memory. Thus, the sessions would like to explore how daily practices an d permanent installations of commemoration give shape to medieval understanding of time and space.

In order to go beyond the state of art, and to nuance the boundaries between private and public spaces, religious and political ceremonies, individual and collective memory, these sessions aim to gather specialists from different disciplines: history, art history, epigraphy, literature, liturgy, musicology… At the crossroad of visual studies and social history, the sessions would like to echo the new research trends on the complex notion of “memory” by articulating within a single approach historical facts and the material way they have been understood and commemorated by medieval groups and individuals.

Vincent Debiais

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May 13th, 8:30 AM

Memory: Public Display and Material Evidences I

Bernhard 208

The two sessions cosponsored by the IMS-Paris and the CESCM-Poitiers aim to explore how medieval men and women used material devices, artefacts, and inscriptions to stage the memory of people and facts in public spaces.

In the perspective of Oexle’s seminal work, participants are invited to elaborate on the meaning and shape of public monuments erected for individual or institutional commemorations, and on the effect of such devices in the collective construction of past. Commemorative inscriptions, statues, fountains, columns translate memory into material signs, footprints of the past in medieval landscapes. In the other hand, public ceremonies, processions and liturgical celebrations need provisional constructions and displays to perform the public and demonstrative side of memory. Thus, the sessions would like to explore how daily practices an d permanent installations of commemoration give shape to medieval understanding of time and space.

In order to go beyond the state of art, and to nuance the boundaries between private and public spaces, religious and political ceremonies, individual and collective memory, these sessions aim to gather specialists from different disciplines: history, art history, epigraphy, literature, liturgy, musicology… At the crossroad of visual studies and social history, the sessions would like to echo the new research trends on the complex notion of “memory” by articulating within a single approach historical facts and the material way they have been understood and commemorated by medieval groups and individuals.

Vincent Debiais