Session Title

Old Wine in New Bottles: Contemporary Uses of Medieval Languages (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

David Carlton

Organizer Affiliation

Western Univ.

Presider Name

Adam Oberlin

Presider Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 1

Wandering through Sildaleikalanda: Translating Nineteenth-Century Children's Literature into Gothic and Old Saxon

Presenter 1 Name

David Carlton

Paper Title 2

Active Latin for Medievalists

Presenter 2 Name

Gregory Stringer

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Burlington High School/Paideia Institute for Humanistic Study

Paper Title 3

Targeting Two Cultures: Thoughts on Translating a Classic into Old English

Presenter 3 Name

Peter S. Baker

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Paper Title 4

Towards a Contemporary Gothic: For Goths, Philologists, and Emo-Kids

Presenter 4 Name

Benjamin Paul Johnson

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Start Date

12-5-2018 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

This roundtable will explore the modern uses of pre-modern languages beyond their role as passive tools for the consumption of medieval and ancient literature. This session will discuss the translation of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland into Gothic, Old Saxon, and Old English, the utility and pedagogy of "active" Latin inside and outside the classroom, and the creation of a speculative constructed language (or "conlang") using Gothic, Latin, and Old Church Slavonic as linguistic foundations.

David A. Carlton

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Old Wine in New Bottles: Contemporary Uses of Medieval Languages (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1045

This roundtable will explore the modern uses of pre-modern languages beyond their role as passive tools for the consumption of medieval and ancient literature. This session will discuss the translation of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland into Gothic, Old Saxon, and Old English, the utility and pedagogy of "active" Latin inside and outside the classroom, and the creation of a speculative constructed language (or "conlang") using Gothic, Latin, and Old Church Slavonic as linguistic foundations.

David A. Carlton