Session Title

Translating Genres: From Arabic Prose to European Literatures

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Organizer Name

Mario Cossío Olavide; Emma Snowden

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Presider Name

David Wacks

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Oregon

Paper Title 1

Translating Genres in the Iberian Confessio amantis: From England to Africa

Presenter 1 Name

Ana Sáez-Hidalgo

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. de Valladolid

Paper Title 2

Ask Now the Beasts and They Shall Teach You: Qalonymos ben Qalonymos and His Hebrew Translation of the Epistle of the Animals

Presenter 2 Name

Noam Sienna

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 3

Of Birds and Kings: Tracing Muslim Folklore through Medieval and Renaissance Spain

Presenter 3 Name

David M. Reher

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 4

Arab and Islamic Identity in al-Saraqusṭī's Al-Maqāmāt al-Luzūmīyah

Presenter 4 Name

Emma Snowden

Start Date

12-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

This panel explores various aspects of the genesis, translation, impact, and legacy of medieval Arabic prose written in Europe in Latin, romance vernaculars and Hebrew (especially in areas of intense cultural contact such as the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and southern France). Of particular interest are approaches that consider Arabic and European prose works--such as maqāmāt, historical chronicles, didactic and gnomic collections, or frame-tale narratives--in the larger context of dialogue across faiths, linguistic traditions, and geopolitical boundaries.

Mario Cossio Olavide

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Translating Genres: From Arabic Prose to European Literatures

Bernhard 213

This panel explores various aspects of the genesis, translation, impact, and legacy of medieval Arabic prose written in Europe in Latin, romance vernaculars and Hebrew (especially in areas of intense cultural contact such as the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and southern France). Of particular interest are approaches that consider Arabic and European prose works--such as maqāmāt, historical chronicles, didactic and gnomic collections, or frame-tale narratives--in the larger context of dialogue across faiths, linguistic traditions, and geopolitical boundaries.

Mario Cossio Olavide