Session Title

Using the New Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts (A Workshop)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts Project, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

Organizer Name

Lynn Ransom

Organizer Affiliation

Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, Univ. of Pennsylvania Libraries

Presider Name

Lynn Ransom

Paper Title 1

Workshop Leader

Presenter 1 Name

Emma Cawlfield

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, Univ. of Pennsylvania Libraries

Paper Title 2

Workshop Leader

Presenter 2 Name

Toby Burrows

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Oxford e-Research Centre

Start Date

10-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

Since 1997, the Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts (SDBM) has aggregated observations of pre-modern manuscripts drawn from over 12,000 auction and sales catalogs, inventories, catalogs from institutional and private collections, and other sources that document sales and locations of these books from around the world. In 2017, the New SDBM was launched to allow members of our user community to contribute and refine data, engage with other users, and participate in building a Name Authority of persons and institutions involved in the history of manuscript transmission. In addition to these features, users can bookmark, “watch,” and download records, as well as create user groups to gather records to share data and collaborate on data entry and discovery. This workshop will demonstrate how these features can be used to collect and add to data, research provenance, track the dispersal of or reconstruct historic collections, and explore a number of other research questions using SDBM data.

Lynn Ransom

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Using the New Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts (A Workshop)

Fetzer 1010

Since 1997, the Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts (SDBM) has aggregated observations of pre-modern manuscripts drawn from over 12,000 auction and sales catalogs, inventories, catalogs from institutional and private collections, and other sources that document sales and locations of these books from around the world. In 2017, the New SDBM was launched to allow members of our user community to contribute and refine data, engage with other users, and participate in building a Name Authority of persons and institutions involved in the history of manuscript transmission. In addition to these features, users can bookmark, “watch,” and download records, as well as create user groups to gather records to share data and collaborate on data entry and discovery. This workshop will demonstrate how these features can be used to collect and add to data, research provenance, track the dispersal of or reconstruct historic collections, and explore a number of other research questions using SDBM data.

Lynn Ransom