Session Title

Fake News: A Medieval Phenomenon (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Goliardic Society, Western Michigan Univ.

Organizer Name

Jillian Patch

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Jillian Patch

Paper Title 1

Supernatural Sensations: Broadsides, Ballads, and News of the Uncanny in Early Modern England

Presenter 1 Name

Thea Tomaini

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Paper Title 2

From Muslim to Christian Hero

Presenter 2 Name

Christine Pruden

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Fake News of Folk Histories: Some Histories Lie, Others Spread Fake News

Presenter 3 Name

Thomas Leek

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Start Date

10-5-2018 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1345

Description

To quote Michael Moore, ‘we are living in fictitious times’, however, this is not a fatality. As students of the medieval past, it is our duty to transmit to our undergraduate students not only historical content but also the critical tools that will enable them to decipher the signal from the noise both in their area of study and as responsible citizens. The idea of fake news is not a new phenomenon though it would appear that way with the explosion of Twitter and Facebook at the beginning of this century. However, medievalists and other scholars within the humanities are not often shocked by the idea of fake news since false legal documents, forged paintings, and anonymous authors are realities of our everyday study. This panel will explore how medieval studies and the skill sets of critical thinking and analysis which it develops in students is applicable in this age of false news. In a world when separating fact from fiction is the job of every citizen and not just an elite few, it has never been more important that medieval studies makes itself and its history known. Jillian Patch

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Fake News: A Medieval Phenomenon (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1345

To quote Michael Moore, ‘we are living in fictitious times’, however, this is not a fatality. As students of the medieval past, it is our duty to transmit to our undergraduate students not only historical content but also the critical tools that will enable them to decipher the signal from the noise both in their area of study and as responsible citizens. The idea of fake news is not a new phenomenon though it would appear that way with the explosion of Twitter and Facebook at the beginning of this century. However, medievalists and other scholars within the humanities are not often shocked by the idea of fake news since false legal documents, forged paintings, and anonymous authors are realities of our everyday study. This panel will explore how medieval studies and the skill sets of critical thinking and analysis which it develops in students is applicable in this age of false news. In a world when separating fact from fiction is the job of every citizen and not just an elite few, it has never been more important that medieval studies makes itself and its history known. Jillian Patch