Session Title

Imagining the Afterlife

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale Univ.; Medieval Studies Program, Yale Univ.

Organizer Name

Gina Marie Hurley; Clara Wild; Kristen Herdman

Organizer Affiliation

Yale Univ.; Yale Univ.; Yale Univ.

Presider Name

Clara Wild

Paper Title 1

"What Quill of Scribe, What Voice, What Tongue!" : Forgetting Heaven in the Apocalypsis Goliae

Presenter 1 Name

Thomas C. Sawyer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Paper Title 2

Dying Eternally: On the Rhetoric of Anchoritic Pleasure

Presenter 2 Name

Clare Davidson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Western Australia

Paper Title 3

Taking the Fifth Road: Fairyland in Middle English Romances

Presenter 3 Name

Chera A. Cole

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas Woman's Univ.

Paper Title 4

Nature, Religious Experience, and the Afterlife

Presenter 4 Name

Ryan Lawrence

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2018 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 106

Description

From the sermons preached in parish churches to the tympanums which adorned great cathedrals, the inevitability of the afterlife is enshrined in scenes of judgment and depictions of events yet to come. As Alastair Minnis has shown in From Eden to Eternity, scholastic discussions of the afterlife were not merely theoretical speculations. They had broad implications for the understanding of human nature, both as it should have been and as it could be. Even outside the universities, ideas about the afterlife were explored in diverse mediums: from the Visio Tundalis, to Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights to Dante’s Divine Comedy. Moreover, as Barbara Newman’s work has revealed, women had substantial influence on the creation of doctrines about purgatory and the forms of piety that developed in response to them. Papers might address these and other questions: Why and how were these literary, theological, and artistic representations constructed and what were their impact? What are the sounds, the feelings, the scents and the sights of heaven, purgatory, and hell? How did ideas about the afterlife manifest in practices and rituals around death and burial?

Gina M. Hurley

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Imagining the Afterlife

Bernhard 106

From the sermons preached in parish churches to the tympanums which adorned great cathedrals, the inevitability of the afterlife is enshrined in scenes of judgment and depictions of events yet to come. As Alastair Minnis has shown in From Eden to Eternity, scholastic discussions of the afterlife were not merely theoretical speculations. They had broad implications for the understanding of human nature, both as it should have been and as it could be. Even outside the universities, ideas about the afterlife were explored in diverse mediums: from the Visio Tundalis, to Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights to Dante’s Divine Comedy. Moreover, as Barbara Newman’s work has revealed, women had substantial influence on the creation of doctrines about purgatory and the forms of piety that developed in response to them. Papers might address these and other questions: Why and how were these literary, theological, and artistic representations constructed and what were their impact? What are the sounds, the feelings, the scents and the sights of heaven, purgatory, and hell? How did ideas about the afterlife manifest in practices and rituals around death and burial?

Gina M. Hurley