Session Title

Networks of Patronage in Central Europe

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Austrian Studies, Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Hill Museum&Manuscript Library (HMML)

Organizer Name

Jan Volek

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Presider Name

Matthew Z. Heintzelman

Presider Affiliation

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

Paper Title 1

Electing a Patron: The Reciprocal Patronage of the Fifteenth-Century Bohemian Estates and Their King

Presenter 1 Name

Lisa Scott

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 2

Beyond Salvation: Religious Patronage in Central Europe during the Fifteenth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Jan Volek

Paper Title 3

Sponsoring Reform in Early Reformation Prussia: Amicable Contests between Catholics, Lutherans, and Anabaptists

Presenter 3 Name

Bryan D. Kozik

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Start Date

10-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

This panel examines the diverse aspects of patronage and its dynamic in the context of late medieval Central Europe. The exploration will especially accentuate the political, cultural, and religious dimensions of the patron—client relationships in local and regional contexts. Whether it was political clientele, support of local church, or effecting a religious change, patronage helped to facilitate historical developments throughout Central Europe in fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.

Jan Volek

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Networks of Patronage in Central Europe

Schneider 1140

This panel examines the diverse aspects of patronage and its dynamic in the context of late medieval Central Europe. The exploration will especially accentuate the political, cultural, and religious dimensions of the patron—client relationships in local and regional contexts. Whether it was political clientele, support of local church, or effecting a religious change, patronage helped to facilitate historical developments throughout Central Europe in fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.

Jan Volek