Session Title

Teaching a Diverse and Inclusive Middle Ages (A Panel Discussion)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

CARA (Committee on Centers and Regional Associations, Medieval Academy of America)

Organizer Name

Sarah Davis-Secord

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of New Mexico

Presider Name

Sarah Davis-Secord

Paper Title 1

Meeting Students Where They Are: Teaching Medieval Studies in Tribal Colleges and R1 Institutions

Presenter 1 Name

Tarren Andrews

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes/Univ. of Colorado-Boulder

Paper Title 2

Indigenous Leorneras: Connecting Native American Students and Old English

Presenter 2 Name

Janet Schrunk Ericksen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Morris

Paper Title 3

Inclusivity and Medievalism: Reflections on a Critical Pedagogy

Presenter 3 Name

Schuyler Eastin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-San Diego

Paper Title 4

"But where are we in this story?": Teaching the Middle Ages at a Historically Black College/University

Presenter 4 Name

Aman Nadhiri

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Johnson C. Smith Univ.

Paper Title 5

Teaching Hard History

Presenter 5 Name

Kim Klimek

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Metropolitan State Univ. of Denver

Start Date

9-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

This panel discussion will continue the conversation about how we can best serve all of our students in the classroom by responsibly including topics of study related to diverse populations. We will also ask how best to attract students from diverse backgrounds into courses on medieval topics, which have much to say on contemporary debates about marginalized groups and images of "the other." Five panelists who have experience teaching to and about a diverse and inclusive classroom will discuss their experiences. Sarah Davis-Secord

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Teaching a Diverse and Inclusive Middle Ages (A Panel Discussion)

Fetzer 1005

This panel discussion will continue the conversation about how we can best serve all of our students in the classroom by responsibly including topics of study related to diverse populations. We will also ask how best to attract students from diverse backgrounds into courses on medieval topics, which have much to say on contemporary debates about marginalized groups and images of "the other." Five panelists who have experience teaching to and about a diverse and inclusive classroom will discuss their experiences. Sarah Davis-Secord