Session Title

Medieval Musical Iconography in the Digital Age: Sorbonne-Columbia FAB-Musiconis (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Susan Boynton

Organizer Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Presider Name

Susan Boynton

Paper Title 1

Adventures in Defining, Translating, and Teaching Medieval Musical Iconography

Presenter 1 Name

Lindsay S. Cook

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Vassar College

Paper Title 2

Creating Records in the Musiconis Database

Presenter 2 Name

Florentin Morel

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Paris-Sorbonne

Paper Title 3

Lute or Vielle? Elders of the Apocalypse and Their Instruments in Romanesque Sculpture

Presenter 3 Name

Sébastien Biay

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Institut national d’histoire de l’art

Paper Title 4

Harp or "Rote" (Harp-Psaltery)? Details on the Photos of Musiconis Database

Presenter 4 Name

Frédéric Billiet

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. de Paris-Sorbonne

Paper Title 5

Thinking through Audiences: Use-Case Scenarios and Design Best Practices for Collaborative Digital Humanities Projects

Presenter 5 Name

Emogene S. Cataldo

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

FAB-Musiconis is a project of Columbia University and Paris-Sorbonne University funded by the Partner University Fund of the FACE Foundation. From 2016-2019, graduate student medievalists from each of the two partner universities participated in a dedicated exchange program between Paris and New York providing them with a well-rounded formation in digital humanities approaches to the analysis and description of medieval images of music using the Sorbonne's Musiconis metabase. This metabase pulls in records from partner databases (such as Gothic Ivories) with images of art objects in a wide range of media including manuscripts, ivories, sculpture, and painting. The Musiconis records add carefully curated metadata that us specific to the musical imagery, including descriptions of instruments and playing techniques. The multidisciplinary group included musicologists, art historians, and computer scientists whose collaborative research focuses on the development of new methods for cataloguing images and on applications of ontologies and linked data to the classification of musical iconography. The session will focus on the Musiconis metabase; the application of controlled vocabularies to the analysis of medieval images of music; the future of musical iconography; and the insights that this project offers into the use of the digital humanities in teaching medieval studies. Susan Boynton

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Musical Iconography in the Digital Age: Sorbonne-Columbia FAB-Musiconis (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 204

FAB-Musiconis is a project of Columbia University and Paris-Sorbonne University funded by the Partner University Fund of the FACE Foundation. From 2016-2019, graduate student medievalists from each of the two partner universities participated in a dedicated exchange program between Paris and New York providing them with a well-rounded formation in digital humanities approaches to the analysis and description of medieval images of music using the Sorbonne's Musiconis metabase. This metabase pulls in records from partner databases (such as Gothic Ivories) with images of art objects in a wide range of media including manuscripts, ivories, sculpture, and painting. The Musiconis records add carefully curated metadata that us specific to the musical imagery, including descriptions of instruments and playing techniques. The multidisciplinary group included musicologists, art historians, and computer scientists whose collaborative research focuses on the development of new methods for cataloguing images and on applications of ontologies and linked data to the classification of musical iconography. The session will focus on the Musiconis metabase; the application of controlled vocabularies to the analysis of medieval images of music; the future of musical iconography; and the insights that this project offers into the use of the digital humanities in teaching medieval studies. Susan Boynton