Session Title

The Middle Ages, What Does It Have to Do with Me? (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Material Collective

Organizer Name

Rachel Dressler; Maeve Doyle

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. at Albany; Eastern Connecticut State Univ.

Presider Name

Maeve Doyle

Paper Title 1

Medieval Identities in the Modern Classroom

Presenter 1 Name

Sarah Bromberg

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Lesley Univ.

Paper Title 2

Social Media as a Ground for Connecting Schools and Scholars

Presenter 2 Name

Lisa Gilbert

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Nahir I. Otaño Gracia

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Beloit College

Start Date

11-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

What does medieval art, culture, and history have to do with my life; what is the point of knowing this stuff? Immersed in the study of the Middle Ages as we are, we may lose sight of the fact that for many people the material to which we are passionately devoted holds little to no interest. It is our hope that this roundtable discussion can produce some strategies for countering this disengagement.

As we consider how to expand access to and engagement with the field, we invite consideration of the roles identity can play in both academic and popular engagement with Medieval Studies. From its antiquarian origins to today, the field has been shaped by nationalist identities, impulses, and agendas. In more recent decades, scholarly attention to gender, racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual identities has expanded and re-shaped the field and created opportunities for multiple identifications with the past. We also wish to question this paradigm: must engagement be structured by identity? Rachel Dressler

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

The Middle Ages, What Does It Have to Do with Me? (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1360

What does medieval art, culture, and history have to do with my life; what is the point of knowing this stuff? Immersed in the study of the Middle Ages as we are, we may lose sight of the fact that for many people the material to which we are passionately devoted holds little to no interest. It is our hope that this roundtable discussion can produce some strategies for countering this disengagement.

As we consider how to expand access to and engagement with the field, we invite consideration of the roles identity can play in both academic and popular engagement with Medieval Studies. From its antiquarian origins to today, the field has been shaped by nationalist identities, impulses, and agendas. In more recent decades, scholarly attention to gender, racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual identities has expanded and re-shaped the field and created opportunities for multiple identifications with the past. We also wish to question this paradigm: must engagement be structured by identity? Rachel Dressler