Session Title

Patrons of the Franciscans

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Texas Medieval Association (TEMA)

Organizer Name

John M. Howe

Organizer Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Presider Name

Brenda Bolton

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of London

Paper Title 1

The Universality of Remission: The Wide Reach of Nicholas IV’s Indulgences and Their Role in His Global Politics

Presenter 1 Name

Ethan Leong Yee

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 2

Franciscan Ways of Conversion during the Thirteenth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Olga Posazhennikova

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 3

Thomas of Eccleston: Constructing Franciscan Memories in Thirteenth-Century England

Presenter 3 Name

Lane J. Sobehrad

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1335

Description

The Franciscans, who first appeared as humble beggars around 1210, sought to imitate Christ in his poverty. But, as had happened before in monastic history, initial success attracted not only crowds of followers but also a variety of patrons who, motivated by piety and profit, who were happy to support and subsidize the new movement. These patrons included townsmen, nobles, kings, and even the pope himself. The urban origin of the Franciscans meant that increasingly wealthy city dwellers--whose roles in supporting older, often aristocratic monastic foundations tended to be marginal—now had opportunities to become close associates of the friars. Yet there may have been an implicit contradiction between Francis’s wish that his followers remain minores and his respect and deference to a powerful hierarchical Church eager to employ for its own purposes their mobility, learning, and preaching.

Recent mendicant scholarship has been focusing less on the friars themselves and more on the roles they soon came to play in thirteenth-century European society. A conference session devoted to the Franciscans and their patrons could showcase some of this new work.

-- John Howe

Professor of History

Texas Tech University

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Patrons of the Franciscans

Schneider 1335

The Franciscans, who first appeared as humble beggars around 1210, sought to imitate Christ in his poverty. But, as had happened before in monastic history, initial success attracted not only crowds of followers but also a variety of patrons who, motivated by piety and profit, who were happy to support and subsidize the new movement. These patrons included townsmen, nobles, kings, and even the pope himself. The urban origin of the Franciscans meant that increasingly wealthy city dwellers--whose roles in supporting older, often aristocratic monastic foundations tended to be marginal—now had opportunities to become close associates of the friars. Yet there may have been an implicit contradiction between Francis’s wish that his followers remain minores and his respect and deference to a powerful hierarchical Church eager to employ for its own purposes their mobility, learning, and preaching.

Recent mendicant scholarship has been focusing less on the friars themselves and more on the roles they soon came to play in thirteenth-century European society. A conference session devoted to the Franciscans and their patrons could showcase some of this new work.

-- John Howe

Professor of History

Texas Tech University