Session Title

Forging Memory: False Documents and Historical Consciousness in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Levi Roach

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Exeter

Presider Name

Benjamin Pohl

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Bristol

Paper Title 1

Pope Hadrian I's Letter to Archbishop Tilpin of Rheims and the Forging of Episcopal Authority

Presenter 1 Name

Edward Roberts

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Kent

Paper Title 2

Can't Get You Offa My Mind: Memory, Conquest, and the Vitae Offarum duorum

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew Aiello

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 3

"Silent Wardens of the Long-Vanished Kingdom": Carolingian Rulers in Forged Ottonian Diplomas

Presenter 3 Name

Alice Hicklin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Freie Univ. Berlin

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 2345

Description

Over the last two decades, scholars have shown great interest in how group and institutional identities were constructed and contested within (and beyond) the Middle Ages. Much attention has been given to the role of narrative histories of peoples, regions and religious houses in this context. Only relatively recently, however, has the contribution of more ‘documentary’ sources come to be appreciated. In recent years, we have learned that cartularies and cartulary-chronicles are not merely repositories of texts, but powerful statements about local and institutional identity. These sessions seek to develop these lines of investigation further by examining the contribution of forgery to these processes. They aim to bridge the gap between the study of historical memory (which until recently has taken written narratives as its starting point) and documentary forgery (which tends to focus on the legal implications of such texts), offering new vantage points on old problems regarding uses of the past in the Middle Ages. Levi Roach

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Forging Memory: False Documents and Historical Consciousness in the Middle Ages

Schneider 2345

Over the last two decades, scholars have shown great interest in how group and institutional identities were constructed and contested within (and beyond) the Middle Ages. Much attention has been given to the role of narrative histories of peoples, regions and religious houses in this context. Only relatively recently, however, has the contribution of more ‘documentary’ sources come to be appreciated. In recent years, we have learned that cartularies and cartulary-chronicles are not merely repositories of texts, but powerful statements about local and institutional identity. These sessions seek to develop these lines of investigation further by examining the contribution of forgery to these processes. They aim to bridge the gap between the study of historical memory (which until recently has taken written narratives as its starting point) and documentary forgery (which tends to focus on the legal implications of such texts), offering new vantage points on old problems regarding uses of the past in the Middle Ages. Levi Roach