Session Title

"Records and Recording": Reputation and Accounts across Social Class in Late Medieval England

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of History, Durham Univ.

Organizer Name

Ryan K. Wicklund

Organizer Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Presider Name

William Raybould

Presider Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 1

The Use of Reputation and Historical Sources in the Writings of John Wessington, Prior of Durham 1416-1446

Presenter 1 Name

James Cronin

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 2

A Noble Concern: Reputation, Authority, and the Scandalum Magnatum Statutes of Late Medieval England

Presenter 2 Name

Rhiannon Snaith

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 3

Monstrous Silhouette: The Black Plague and Morgan le Fey

Presenter 3 Name

Savannah Woodworth

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Arizona State Univ.

Paper Title 4

"Twelve Shillings for the Sergeant": The Reputation and Productivity of Agricultural Managers in Manorial Accounts

Presenter 4 Name

Ryan K. Wicklund

Start Date

10-5-2019 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1340

Description

This session will explore different perspectives on reputation and its reflection in records throughout England in the Late Middle Ages. The importance of reputation transcended social class and allows historians to discuss the values of the societies and circles in which these individuals lived and travelled. Papers for this session will consider how accounts—here encompassing both written accounts and visual and material culture—shaped and impacted the reputations of these individuals. This session will focus on how different social groups dealt with events that harmed or heightened their reputations in social and, perhaps anachronistically, professional settings. Ryan Wicklund

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

"Records and Recording": Reputation and Accounts across Social Class in Late Medieval England

Schneider 1340

This session will explore different perspectives on reputation and its reflection in records throughout England in the Late Middle Ages. The importance of reputation transcended social class and allows historians to discuss the values of the societies and circles in which these individuals lived and travelled. Papers for this session will consider how accounts—here encompassing both written accounts and visual and material culture—shaped and impacted the reputations of these individuals. This session will focus on how different social groups dealt with events that harmed or heightened their reputations in social and, perhaps anachronistically, professional settings. Ryan Wicklund