Session Title

Adaptation and Appropriation: Liturgies for New Power Realities in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

PSALM-Network (Politics, Society and Liturgy in the Middle Ages)

Organizer Name

Paweł Figurski

Organizer Affiliation

Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences

Presider Name

Margot E. Fassler

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 1

The Offices of Royal Saints on the Peripheries of High Medieval Christendom

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Hasseler

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Paper Title 2

The Making of Royal Saints in Early Rus

Presenter 2 Name

Sean Griffin

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Dartmouth College

Paper Title 3

Making the World as It Was Meant to Be Made? Christian Liturgy and the Formation of Polish Political Identity in the Middle Ages

Presenter 3 Name

Paweł Figurski

Start Date

10-5-2019 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1130

Description

Recent scholarship is demonstrating an increased interest in the dynamic relation between politics and liturgy in the Middle Ages. Essential is the dominant, traditionalizing power of liturgy to shape realities (both intellectual and practical) from which stable meaning could be derived in complex and continuously changing contexts. Indeed, contrary to what rough overviews of normative sources might suggest, liturgy was often much more contextual than has been held until now – and so were its sources. If it wasn’t highly local in formal differences, then at least in the juxtaposition of its universal character with each, necessarily unique, political context and identity in which it was performed.

This session, therefore, wishes to delve deeper in a fundamental historical aspect of the relation between liturgy and politics, by comparing examples of the (often paradoxical) interactions between tradition and change. The session will bring together papers that investigate change in political situations (be they secular or ecclesiastical) and whether and how this impacted (particular) liturgies, or, vice versa, where liturgical adaptations were meant to inspire new realities and political traditions. Pawel Figurski

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Adaptation and Appropriation: Liturgies for New Power Realities in the Middle Ages

Schneider 1130

Recent scholarship is demonstrating an increased interest in the dynamic relation between politics and liturgy in the Middle Ages. Essential is the dominant, traditionalizing power of liturgy to shape realities (both intellectual and practical) from which stable meaning could be derived in complex and continuously changing contexts. Indeed, contrary to what rough overviews of normative sources might suggest, liturgy was often much more contextual than has been held until now – and so were its sources. If it wasn’t highly local in formal differences, then at least in the juxtaposition of its universal character with each, necessarily unique, political context and identity in which it was performed.

This session, therefore, wishes to delve deeper in a fundamental historical aspect of the relation between liturgy and politics, by comparing examples of the (often paradoxical) interactions between tradition and change. The session will bring together papers that investigate change in political situations (be they secular or ecclesiastical) and whether and how this impacted (particular) liturgies, or, vice versa, where liturgical adaptations were meant to inspire new realities and political traditions. Pawel Figurski