Session Title

The Fourteenth-Century Painted Ceiling of the Sala Magna in Palazzo Chiaromonte-Steri in Palermo II: The Sala Magna's Ceiling in Context: Medieval Painted Ceilings in the Mediterranean, Tenth-Fourteenth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Italian Art Society

Organizer Name

Licia Buttà

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. Rovira i Virgili–Tarragona

Presider Name

Vera Segre

Presider Affiliation

Univ. de Lausanne

Paper Title 1

Behind the Imaginary of Painted Ceilings from the Kingdom of Valencia: Seeking Links between Sense, Space, and Context

Presenter 1 Name

Maria del Mar Valls Fusté

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. Rovira i Virgili–Tarragona

Paper Title 2

Text and Images in Medieval Painted Ceilings

Presenter 2 Name

Text and Images in Medieval Painted Ceilings

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Start Date

10-5-2019 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1710

Description

The session aims to discuss the singularity of the Sala Magna as compared to other painted ceilings in the Mediterranean region. Recently an increasing number of medieval painted ceilings have been studied. The wooden roofs in the territories of the ancient Crown of Aragon or in France, the rich Sicilian heritage in its Arab-Norman declination merely confirm the need of looking at the decoration of these artefacts as vehicles for the circulation and transmission of a Mediterranean visual culture.

Licia Buttà

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

The Fourteenth-Century Painted Ceiling of the Sala Magna in Palazzo Chiaromonte-Steri in Palermo II: The Sala Magna's Ceiling in Context: Medieval Painted Ceilings in the Mediterranean, Tenth-Fourteenth Century

Sangren 1710

The session aims to discuss the singularity of the Sala Magna as compared to other painted ceilings in the Mediterranean region. Recently an increasing number of medieval painted ceilings have been studied. The wooden roofs in the territories of the ancient Crown of Aragon or in France, the rich Sicilian heritage in its Arab-Norman declination merely confirm the need of looking at the decoration of these artefacts as vehicles for the circulation and transmission of a Mediterranean visual culture.

Licia Buttà